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列治文分館慶祝重開週年

Contact: Michelle Jeffers  (415) 557-4282; mjeffers@sfpl.org

Dedication of new public artwork sculpture by Scott Donahue

The Richmond/Senator Milton Marks Branch Library celebrates the one-year anniversary of its renovation and reopening with an open house at the branch at 351 9th Ave., on Saturday, May 15, beginning at 1 p.m.

The day’s activities include:

1-2 p.m.: Lion dancers from Washington High School

Poetry reading by Yvonne Cannon

Dedication of new public artwork titled Touching Earth by Bay Area artist Scott Donahue. Commissioned by the San Francisco Arts Commission for the library, the artwork features two bowl-shaped concrete vessels that are 50-inches wide at the top and 9-inches high. Each vessel is capped with a bronze epoxy disk embossed with maps of the Bay Area in relief. Imbedded within the disks are small porcelain enamel disks depicting the history of transportation in the Bay Area. The artworks are located in front of the benches on the 10th Avenue plaza, on either side of the outdoor path leading to the front door.

West Portal Performing Arts fan dance and ribbon dance

2-4 p.m.: Puppeteer Dmitry Rashkin shares his delightful puppets with children of all ages. Fluffy marionettes, hand puppets and limberjacks dance to live international music provided by Svetlana Chernitskaya.

Recycling demonstration with Andrea Deleon of SF Environment

Ellen Burns of SCRAP leads arts and crafts projects with recycled materials

3 p.m.: Eddie Madril performs some of the most popular and rare Native American dances, including the Grass dance, Hoop dance and Fancy dance. He will discuss the dances and tell stories. For children 5 and older.

4 p.m.: Ruth Keady, a long time San Francisco resident and accomplished vocalist, sings some of her jazz favorites, accompanied by musicians Si Perkoff (piano), Scott Chapek (bass) and Madaline Duran (reeds).

The Richmond/Senator Milton Marks Branch reopened on May 16, 2009. It was the 10th branch to be completed under the Branch Library Improvement Program (BLIP). The project brought almost 50 percent more square feet to the branch and provided for a complete renovation and restoration, including seismic upgrade, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) access improvements, energy-efficient building systems and technology upgrades, while retaining the historical integrity of this 1914 Carnegie landmark building. The building’s historic restoration recently won recognition by the American Public Works Association, Northern California chapter.