Monthly Archives: April 2013

California Poets in the Schools’ Students’ Grand Slam Poetry Reading in collaboration with the San Francisco Giants’ Community Fund and Jr. Giants

For Immediate Release
April  26, 2013

Contact:
Susan Terence
Calif. Poets in the Schools
415-751-6770
susieluz@gmail.com

California Poets in the Schools’ Students’ Grand Slam Poetry Reading in collaboration with the San Francisco Giants’ Community Fund and Jr. Giants

California Poets in the Schools (CPITS) in collaboration with the San Francisco Giants’ Community Fund/ Jr. Giants’ Program and the San Francisco Main Library will be hosting a city-wide students’ poetry reading featuring K-12  SFUSD  students at the San Francisco Main Library Koret Auditorium on Sunday, May 26, from 1-4 p.m.   As part of a year-long project, students wrote poems about baseball history, the SF Giants, their own lives and communities, and their dreams for the future.  Students’ poems will be collected in classroom anthologies as well as in a city-wide students’ baseball poetry anthology to be distributed to schools and libraries. Musical entertainment will be provided by the Boondock Squad accompanied by singer, JT Teodoro.  A reception will follow the reading.  The Main Library is located at 100 Larkin St.  The event is free to the public.

California Poets in the Schools, the largest writer-in-the-schools program of its kind in the country, is in its 48th year of sending professional published writers into classrooms, libraries, juvenile halls, and hospital programs to help California students recognize and celebrate their own creativity and intellectual curiosity through the creative writing process.  For more information, contact info@cpits.org, (415) 221-4201 or www.cpits.org.

I wish I were
the lonely Tim Lincecum
during summer
on the blue pitcher’s mound
dropping the moon
over home plate.

–Group Poem

Ms. Gina Robertson’s 1st and 2nd grade class, New Traditions

It’s a homerun!
It’s a bat hitting a rocket
far into fans in orange and black.
It’s  spinning, hurling, gliding
towards the fans.  The
crowd goes wild!  It
screams!  It’s a
home run!  Hot
dogs drop, sodas spill.
Mouths open like black holes.

–Jayden Lui, 5th grade, FS Key E.S.

SFPL & WritersCorps Present an Installation of Poetry on the Main Library Stairs & Literary Carnival for Teens

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media contacts:

Michelle Jeffers, San Francisco Public Library, 415-557-4282, mjeffers@sfpl.org

Kate Patterson, San Francisco Arts Commission, 415-252-4638, kate.patterson@sfgov.org

San Francisco Public Library & WritersCorps

Present an Installation of Poetry on the Main Library Stairs

& Literary Carnival for Teens

SAN FRANCISCO, April 18, 2013 ― The San Francisco Public Library and WritersCorps, the award-winning youth writing program, announce Step to Poetry, a colorful literary art installation on the Main Library stairs written by WritersCorps youth. The youth, who range in age from 12 to 19, attend an afterschool workshop run by WritersCorps at the Main Library.

The installation will be on view from May 10 through June 10, and consists of nine brief poems about popular culture. Postcards with the poems will also be available for free. A launch event will take place on Friday, May 17 at 6 pm, featuring a stair crawl from the first to fifth floors with WritersCorps youth performing their poems along the way. Space is limited and an RSVP to the event is required as the event takes place after library hours.

WritersCorps teaching artist Minna Dubin says she asked the students to write on popular culture because it was fun. She was also interested in dispelling the notions of poetry being “high brow” and inaccessible and popular culture as being “low brow.”

“Because the Library is such a special place in San Francisco, where people of all different walks of life are in the same space, it seemed appropriate for such a similar merging of art, poetry, and popular culture,” Dubin says. “Popular culture icons are also accessible to all kinds of people. By definition, popular culture permeates, so matter what class, race, language, or gender you identify with, you’ve probably heard of Google, the Kardashians, and Spongebob.”

“Just because popular culture is seen as frivolous and “low brow” doesn’t mean that teens don’t have interesting perspective and are able to write social critique in a thoughtful, fresh, and often hilarious way,” she said.

On May 21, WritersCorps will return to the Main Library for its annual year-end celebration, WordStorm. This literary carnival takes place after school from 3:30 to 6 pm and features hands-on activities, and an open mic where youth will read from newly-released publications. During the school year, WritersCorps worked at 14 sites throughout San Francisco, and published 8 books, a postcard series, and the Step to Poetry installation.

Altogether, the publications feature 453 San Francisco youth who participated in the 2012-13 program. WritersCorps serves approximately 900 youth each year. The writers, who range in age from 10 to 22, give readers a glimpse into the world of young people today. Through poetry, prose and illustration, they explore the complexities of childhood and adolescence, and express their feelings about the issues that matter most to them: family, identity, love, loss, violence and war, their local and international communities.

Calendar Listing

Poetry Stair Crawl

Friday, May 17, 6 pm

San Francisco Main Public Library

100 Larkin Street

Free, RSVP Required

Join the San Francisco Public Library and WritersCorps for an exclusive after-hours launch event for Step to Poetry, a colorful literary art installation on the library stairs written by WritersCorps youth. This event will feature a stair crawl from the first to fifth floors with WritersCorps youth performing their poems about popular culture along the way. Space for this event is limited and an RSVP is required. Contact hello@writerscorps.org or 415-252-2546.

WritersCorps WordStorm

Tuesday, May 21, 3:30-6 pm

San Francisco Main Public Library, Latino Hispanic Room (lower level)

100 Larkin Street

Free

WritersCorps presents a literary carnival for tweens and teens, with hands-on activities, prizes, and an open mic. Students who have been participating in WritersCorps throughout the year will read their work from newly published books.

About WritersCorps 

WritersCorps, a joint project of the San Francisco Arts Commission and San Francisco Public Library, places professional writers in community settings to teach creative writing to youth. Since its inception in 1994, the program has helped nearly 18,000 young people improve their literacy and increase their desire to learn. WritersCorps is a recipient of a 2010 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award from First Lady Michelle Obama and the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities. The program also publishes award-winning publications and produces local and national events featuring young people.

El Día de los Niños, Día de los Libros Celebrating Children and Books

For Immediate Release:

April 11, 2013

El Día de los Niños, Día de los Libros

Celebrating Children and Books

Sunday, April 14, Mission Branch Library

Rooted in a Latin American tradition, El Día de los Niños, Día de los Libros is a child-centered event with the goals of promoting literacy and unifying families of all cultures. San Francisco’s first Día de los Niños, Día de los Libros was in 1999 and each year since then, organizers continue to volunteer their time and resources to achieve the goal of promoting literacy and unifying families of all cultures, through a community-based, child-centered event.

WHO: San Francisco Public Library, SFPL’s Green Bookmobile, Tree Frog Treks, Jamestown’s Youth In Charge Board, Jumpstart, Raising A Reader and Reading Partners

WHEN: Sunday, April 14th

WHERE: Mission Branch Library, 300 Bartlett St. San Francisco, 94110.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

11:15 a.m. – Family Dance Party with Pulsing Word

12 p.m. – Cat Doorman, music concert

1 p.m. – Jorge Argueta & Manlio Argueta, poetry

1:30 p.m. – Francisco Herrera, folk musician

2:15 p.m.- Maikaze Daiko, Taiko drumming

This event is planned in partnership with San Francisco Sunday Streets with support from First 5 San Francisco, Mayor’s Office of Early Care and Education, and the Friends of the San Francisco Public Library.

About SFPL

San Francisco Public Library was a proud winner of the 2009 Raul and Estela Mora Award in recognition of its outstanding decade of Día celebrations. The Library has been celebrating El Día de los Niños, Día de los Libros since 1999 and recognizes the observance of Día as a commitment to honor children and home languages and culture; promote literacy in all languages; involve parents as valued members of the literacy team and promote library collections that reflect our plurality.

About Reading Partners

Reading Partners is a national nonprofit that provides volunteer-led, one-on-one literacy tutoring to K-5 students at low-income elementary schools. Reading Partners has an 89% success rate improving students’ reading skills. At each school site, Reading Partners transforms a dedicated space into a reading center and recruits a corps of 40-100 community volunteers who work directly with students. Volunteers are trained and supported by site coordinators to use a highly structured and research-validated curriculum to work one-on-one with students who have fallen behind in reading. To learn more, visit www.readingpartners.org.

Media Contacts:

Michelle Jeffers
(415) 557-4282
mjeffers@sfpl.org

or

Joe Ventura
(415) 710-1157
joe.ventura@readingpartners.org

Author Eve Bunting to Deliver 2013 Effie Lee Morris Lecture

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 9, 2013

Author Eve Bunting to Deliver 2013 Effie Lee Morris Lecture

Picture Books That Can’t Be Written: Social Issues in Children’s Literature

SF Main Library, April 30, 6 p.m.

Eve Bunting, multi-award-winning author of more than 200 books for preschoolers, school-age children, and young adults, will be the San Francisco Public Library’s special guest speaker at the 17th annual Effie Lee Morris Lecture on Tuesday, April 30 at the San Francisco Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St. Her theme will be “Picture Books That Can’t Be Written: Social Issues in Children’s Literature.” The Library invites the public to attend this free event.

Bunting’s career spans four decades and a wealth of styles, subjects, and genres. Born in Northern Ireland in 1928, she grew up in a book- and word-loving home. Her mother opened a library in their small town, and some of Bunting’s most cherished memories gather around the sound of her father’s gentle voice reading poems aloud. “He was a big tough Irishman who would not have been caught dead reading poetry outside his own family,” she says. But she stills feels her childlike sense of wonder as she absorbed “the beautiful words” he read to her.

Eve Bunting moved with her husband and their three children to the U.S. in 1959, settling first in San Francisco, then in Pasadena. Her early books focused on tales rooted in her Irish heritage, and she has since developed her unusual gift for portraying people from widely diverse backgrounds with sensitivity, nuance, and respect. The majority of her story ideas spring from current events and social trends: Her characters include a homeless boy and his father making the best of living in an airport in Fly Away Home, a Muslim girl struggling to learn English and make friends as a new American in One Green Apple, and a young child, his mother, and their cat caught up in the Los Angeles riots in Smoky Night, with Caldecott Medal-winning illustrations by David Diaz.

Each year, the San Francisco Public Library’s Main Children’s Center, in partnership with Friends of the San Francisco Public Library and the local chapter of the Women’s National Book Association, hosts a distinguished author or illustrator of children’s books as guest lecturer. The event honors the pioneering work of the late Effie Lee Morris, SFPL’s first coordinator of children’s services. Previous lecturers have included Jerry Pinkney and Gerald McDermott.

The 17th Annual Effie Lee Morris Lecture will take place Tuesday, April 30, at 6 pm in the Koret Auditorium of the Main Library, 100 Larkin Street, San Francisco, followed by a book-signing with the author. The Friends of the SFPL will offer a selection of Eve Bunting’s works for sale before and after the lecture. The event will be preceded by a reception in Eve Bunting’s honor, from 5 to 5:45 p.m., in the Library’s Latino-Hispanic Community Meeting Room. For more information, call 415-557-4277.

MEDIA CONTACT:  Michelle Jeffers

(415) 557-4282; mjeffers@sfpl.org