Library Continues Latino Voices Programs

For Immediate Release
Contact: Michelle Jeffers
(415) 557-4282; Michelle.Jeffers@sfpl.org

Library Continues Latino Voices Programs

(February 23, 2016) San Francisco, CA—San Francisco Public Library will continue its Latino Americans: 500 Years of History programming with three events that explore the history of Latino press, radio and comic arts within the U.S.

Jaime Crespo, the author of the comic, Tortilla, will be the featured artist at A History of Latino Comics: El Movimiento on Feb. 25, at 6 p.m. in the Main Library’s Koret Auditorium.  Crespo will take us on a personal journey of his first discoveries of Latino themes in comics. He will explore the effect of everything from car magazines to politically charged works in his comicslatino500.

On April 14, we will be screening Peril and Promise in the Main Library’s Koret Auditorium.  This is a screening of the final episode of the Latino Americans: 500 Years of History video series, which looks at the past 30 years of Latino American history within the U.S.  The video takes a closer look at the second wave of arriving Cubans in the 1980s, and the unrest in El Salvador, Guatemala and Nicaragua that led to hundreds of thousands of new Americans.

Comic artist Jaime Crespo will return on May 12 to the Main Library’s Koret Auditorium with Latino Comics Expo co-founder Ricardo Padilla, for the final program in the series, A History of Latino Comics: The Underground.  The duo will discuss how the Underground Comix scene of the 1960s and 70s stimulated a Latino Comics movement.

Latino Americans: 500 Years of History, a public programming initiative produced by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the American Library Association (ALA), is part of an NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square.

This program is supported by Friends of the San Francisco Public Library, in partnership with Accion Latina, an organization dedicated to promoting cultural arts, community media, and civic engagement as a way of building healthy and empowered Latino communities.