Newbery Medalist Kwame Alexander in conversation with Director of San Francisco Human Rights Commission Sheryl Evans Davis

For Immediate Release
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295
Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

 

Newbery Medalist Kwame Alexander in conversation with Director of San Francisco Human Rights Commission Sheryl Evans Davis

“Children’s book authors have the power to change our imaginations.” – Kwame Alexander



kwame


SAN FRANCISCO, February 13, 2017 — Award-winning author, poet and educator Kwame Alexander will share excerpts from The Playbook, a recent collection of poems and verse inspired by notable athletes and role models such as Nelson Mandela, Serena Williams, LeBron James and Michelle Obama. He will be joined by San Francisco Human Rights Commission Director, Sheryl Evans Davis.

When Alexander received the call in 2015 that his book The Crossover had won the Newbery Medal, he recognized that the two decades spent struggling to make it as a poet had been worth it. “When you’ve been told ‘no’ 20 times, the inclination is to walk out the door,” Alexander told a library audience last year. “Here’s the thing, you’ve always got to say ‘yes’ to yourself.”

Alexander has been describing his uphill battle to literary acclaim to audiences across the country, and the San Francisco Public Library is honored to host the author this Sunday afternoon in the Koret Auditorium for a discussion about his latest work, The Playbook. Alexander often shifts back and forth from conversational speaking to delivering spoken word poetry from his books, and although the subjects of his books make them easy for children to relate (his verse forms often sounds like hip-hop), his live appearances often provide many take-aways for adults as he addresses topics like love and parenting.

Following the event will be an author signing with Alexander and book selling by Friends of the San Francisco Public Library.
This event is presented in partnership with Friends of San Francisco Public Library, African American Center, Jewish Community Center of San Francisco and Collective Impact.

 

About Kwame Alexander
Kwame Alexander is a poet, educator, and the New York Times Bestselling author of 24 books, including The Crossover, which received the 2015 John Newbery Medal for the Most Distinguished Contribution to American literature for Children. Kwame writes for children of all ages. Some of his other works include Score in this game of life, Animal Ark, Out of Wonder and Surf’s Up. Kwame believes that poetry can change the world, and he uses it to inspire and empower young people through his PAGE TO STAGE Writing and Publishing Program.

 

About Sheryl Evans Davis
Sheryl Evans Davis is the Executive Director of the San Francisco Human Rights Commission (HRC). Director Davis previously served as Commissioner between 2011 and 2016, including a tenure as Vice Chair of the Commission. Prior to joining the HRC, Director Davis was Executive Director of Collective Impact, a community-based organization in the Western Addition neighborhood of San Francisco.

 

Kwame Alexander in the Koret – Feb. 19, 2 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Local residents are first to earn high school diploma through innovative program offered by San Francisco Public Library

For Immediate Release
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295
katherine.jardine@sfpl.org

Local residents are first to earn high school diploma through innovative program offered by San Francisco Public Library

Library offers accredited diplomas and career certificates to residents through Career Online High School

highschool

SAN FRANCISCO, February 9, 2017 — Kevin Surles, Vinh Tran and Hassan Basbassi are the first San Francisco residents to earn high school diplomas through the Career Online High School program at the San Francisco Public Library.  The library partnered with Gale, a leading provider of library resources and a Cengage company, in 2015 to offer the innovative program in an effort to help the city’s 94,000 adults who lack a high school diploma.

Last weekend, the Library celebrated the first graduates with staff, family and friends in the San Francisco Public Library’s Learning Studio.  “The Library’s Career Online High School program is a great opportunity for individuals seeking a second chance,” said City Librarian, Luis Herrera. “We are impressed by the diversity of the graduates and their drive to improve their lives; all three graduates, upon entering the program, were fully committed to making a better place for themselves, their families and their communities and we are honored to assist these individuals on their roads to success.”

San Francisco Public Library awards scholarships for Career Online High School to qualified learners looking to earn a high school diploma and advance their careers. Once enrolled, Career Online High School pairs each student with an Academic Coach, who offers ongoing guidance and encouragement, evaluates performance, and connects the learner with the resources needed to demonstrate mastery of the course material. Classes are supported by board-certified instructors and students have 24/7 access to the online learning platform. Coursework begins in one of eight high-growth, high-demand career fields (across a wide spectrum from child care and education to certified transportation), before progressing to the core academic subjects. Students are able to graduate in as few as six months by transferring in previously earned high school credits but are given up to 18 months to complete the program.

Hassan and Vinh both majored in Homeland Security, while Kevin majored in Office Management.   “Kevin, Vinh and Hassan’s achievements are a great example of the direct social and economic impact libraries have on their communities, and Gale is proud to partner with them to make it happen,” said Paul Gazzolo, senior vice president and general manager at Gale.

Residents can learn more about Career Online High School at the San Francisco Public Library, or by visiting the library’s website at sfpl.org.

For more photos and requests to speak with the graduates, please contact katherine.jardine@sfpl.org.

press

 

Marty Nemko Talks Shop – If the Economy is So Recovered, How Come I Still Can’t Find Good Work?

For Immediate Release:
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295; Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

 

Marty Nemko Talks Shop

 If the Economy is So Recovered, How Come I Still Can’t Find Good Work?

San Francisco Public Library is proud to host eminent Bay Area career expert Dr. Marty Nemko. As he does on his KALW-FM (NPR-San Francisco) radio program, Nemko will do Workovers on volunteers from the audience. Uncannily, in just a few minutes, he is able to help nearly every person with their career. Importantly, the embedded career lessons apply not just to that person but to anyone looking to improve their work life.

In addition, Dr. Nemko will share insider truths about popular careers—upsides and little-discussed downsides. Plus his favorite under-the-radar careers.

And if that’s not enough, one of his clients, a true Rocky story, will tell her career story in words and song, with Marty Nemko accompanying on the keyboard. An inspiration for anyone who thinks they’re unemployable.

WHEN: Feb. 1, 2017 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

WHERE: Koret Auditorium, Main Library

Exhibit Opening: The Gardens of Alcatraz

For Immediate Release:
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295; Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

 

Exhibit Opening: The Gardens of Alcatraz
Main Library’s Skylight Gallery

 

More than 60 beautiful and nuanced framed prints of the flowers of Alcatraz are on display in the San Francisco Public Library’s Skylight Gallery beginning this Saturday, January 14 — March 19, 2017.  The detailed works are created by various artists using mediums such as watercolors and colored pencils.

Alcatraz Island has a long and colorful history in California since its naming by the Spanish in 1775. Situated in the San Francisco Bay, it was the ideal location for the U.S. military to establish a fortress to protect shipping during the 1848 Gold Rush, a fort and military prison in 1850 and through the Civil War, and finally, a federal prison in 1930.

During decades of change an unexpected constant has been the gardens of Alcatraz. The many military and prison families softened the harsh environment of The Rock with imported soil, plants and structures. Staff and inmates became the caretakers of this ongoing endeavor. When the federal prison was closed in 1962, the gardens fell into a state of benign neglect.

In 2003, the Garden Conservancy initiated a 10-year restoration project and found many of the long neglected plants had survived. This remarkable discovery became the focus for members of the Northern California Chapter Society of Botanical Artists in 2012. With the support of the National Park Service and Shelag Fritz, the Garden Conservancy Manager, Shelagh Fritz, 77 artists painted “portraits” of the flowers.

The exhibit is sponsored by the Northern California Chapter Society of Botanical Artists, National Park Service, Golden Gate Conservancy, Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy, and Friends of the San Francisco Public Library.

Alcatraz Florilegium Botanical Art Exhibit – Jan. 14 – March 19, Main Library, Skylight Gallery, 6th Floor

Related programs:

Exhibit Opening Event: Alcatraz Gardens – A Testament to the Human Spirit with Shelagh Fritz
Jan. 22, 1 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

The Story Behind the Alcatraz Florilegium with Sally Petru
Feb. 9, 6:30 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Meeting Community Room

Starring the Rock: Alcatraz in Hollywood Movies – Lecture with Jim Van Buskirk
March 2, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

San Francisco Public Library and Litquake Present No Shadow Without Light: Writers Respond to Trump

For Immediate Release:
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295; Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

 

San Francisco Public Library and Litquake Present
No Shadow Without Light: Writers Respond to Trump

On Wednesday, January 18, San Francisco Public Library and Litquake join forces to present an eclectic group of diverse authors and poets speaking to our nation’s fear, anger, and unrest in the post-election season.

No Shadow Without Light: Writers Respond to Trump
January 18, 6-8 p.m.,
San Francisco Main Library,
Lower Level, Koret Auditorium
100 Larkin St., San Francisco

Words from:

Elmaz Abinader — Arab-American author, poet, and Mills College professor (Children of the Roojme: A Family’s Journey from Lebanon)
Faith Adiele — author and editor (The Nigerian-Nordic Girls Guide to Lady Problems; Coming of Age Around the World: A Multicultural Anthology)
Robert Mailer Anderson — novelist and playwright (The Death of Teddy Ballgame, Boonville)
devorah major — San Francisco’s third Poet Laureate (and then we became)
Sarah Ladipo Manyika — novelist and editor (In Dependence; The Weaverbird Collection: New Fiction from Nigeria 2008)
Alejandro Murguía — San Francisco’s current Poet Laureate (Stray Poems: San Francisco Poet Laureate Series No. 6; This War Called Love)
Ishmael Reed — author, editor, journalist, SFJAZZ Poet Laureate (The Complete Muhammad Ali; Black Hollywood Unchained)
Tennessee Reed — poet and activist (City Beautiful: Poems 1998-2006)
T.J. Stiles — author and twice recipient of the Pulitzer Prize (Custer’s Trials: A Life on the Frontier of a New America; The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt)

This event is supported by Friends of the San Francisco Public Library.

Library Fine Amnesty Welcomes Back 100 Year Overdue Book

For Immediate Release:
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295; Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT

Invitation to Cover / Photo Opportunity

Library Fine Amnesty Welcomes Back 100 Year Overdue Book

WHAT:  City Librarian, Luis Herrera, welcomes back one of the longest-overdue books in San Francisco Public Library’s Fine Amnesty history. The book is a selection of short stories, titled Forty Minutes Late, with a due-date stamp of 1917.

 

WHEN:  Forty Minutes Late will be returned at the Park Branch this Friday, January 13 at 2 p.m.

 

WHERE:  1833 Page St, Park Branch

 

WHO: 

·         City Librarian, Luis Herrera

·         Public Relations Officer, Katherine Jardine

·         Webb Johnson, Forty Minutes Late

 

WHAT: San Francisco Public Library’s Fine Forgiveness program runs from Jan. 3–Feb. 14, 2017.  During this six-week period, late fees are waived on all returned books, CDs, DVDs and other materials, regardless of how long overdue. 55,000 patrons currently have outstanding fines, representing approximately $4.5M in overdue fines. The program is an opportunity for residents to reconnect with their library and allows the Library to recover materials. The program aligns with the Library’s commitment to eliminating barriers to service and providing basic access for all San Franciscans, especially those most in need of library services.

We Want You Back! Fine Forgiveness  Jan. 3 – Feb. 14, 2017

San Francisco Public Library Celebrates Diversity in Literature – We Love Diverse Books – January 2017 Programs

For Immediate Release:
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295; Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

San Francisco Public Library Celebrates Diversity in Literature

We Love Diverse Books – January 2017 Programs

The San Francisco Public Library celebrates diversity in San Francisco and in literature with a new series of city-wide programs, titled We Love Diverse Books. The series includes 50 book events and programs throughout the month of January at all neighborhood branches, showcasing the beautiful array of representation that is available between the pages of the Library’s books and collections.

Featured author appearances include New York Times bestseller Daniel José Older, Katrina Goldsaito, author of The Sound of Silence, and Robert Liu-Trujillo, local children’s book creator and author of Furqan’s First Flat Top. Events include the launch of the Black Comix Arts Festival, drag queen story time, cultural cooking classes, book-making workshops, poetry workshops and more.

This new program series is informed by the pioneering work of Dr. Rudin Bishop who stated, “When Children cannot find themselves reflected in the books they read, or when the images they see are distorted, negative, or laughable, they learn a powerful lesson about how they are devalued in the society of which they are a part.” National advocacy efforts have drawn attention to the homogeneity of publishing, and this month the Library is proud to showcase their diverse collections with a host of authors and artists who will be sharing their unique stories.

This program is in collaboration with Blood Orange Press, an independent publisher committed to filling the gaps in the world of children’s books with stories that counteract stereotypes and limitations. We Love Diverse Books is supported by Friends of the San Francisco Public Library.

Featured programs

Daniel Jose Older – Book Reading & Book Signing
Tuesday, Jan. 24, 6 p.m., Koret Auditorium, Main Library

Be the Author of Your Creative Life – Katrina Goldsaito
Saturday, Jan. 14, 1 p.m., The Mix, Main Library

Robert Liu-Trujillo – Book Reading & Workshop
Monday, Jan. 9, 10 a.m., Visitacion Valley Branch
Wednesday, Jan. 11, 10 a.m., Portola Branch

Black Comix Arts Festival Launch
Sunday, Jan. 15, 12 p.m., Koret Auditorium, Main Library

Black Comix Arts Festival Comic-Con
Monday, Jan. 16, CityView Metron, 135 4th Street

Drag Queen Story Hour
Saturday, Jan. 14, 2 p.m., Eureka Valley Branch
Tuesday, Jan. 24., 10:30 a.m., Golden Gate Valley Branch

Tray of Togetherness Tasting
Saturday, Jan. 21, 1:15 p.m., Mission Bay Branch

Book Makers 101 with Blood Orange Press
Tuesday, Jan. 17, 12 p.m., Ortega Branch

Make Your Mark with Magnetic Poetry
Saturday, Jan. 28, 3 p.m., Bernal Heights Branch

Find the entire list of programs in the We Love Diverse Books Program Guide

Or via the Library’s online calendar.

Exhibit Opening: Everyone Deserves a Home Photographs and oral histories on view in the Main Library’s Jewett Gallery, Dec. 17, 2016 – March 12, 2017

For Immediate Release:
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295; Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

Exhibit Opening: Everyone Deserves a Home
Photographs and oral histories on view in the Main Library’s Jewett Gallery, Dec. 17, 2016 – March 12, 2017

Through moving portraits and oral histories of 40 San Francisco residents, Everyone Deserves a Home is an impacting exhibition that tells the story of formerly homeless Californians now living in permanent supportive housing in San Francisco. The exhibit is at the Main Library’s Jewett Gallery from Dec. 17, 2016 through March 17, 2017.

The exhibit explores the question of what drew people or their families to San Francisco, what led them to their current home and what their community means to them. The stories are diverse and compelling; many subjects have histories of chronic homelessness, as well as struggles with health, mental health, and/or substance use issues. They have all worked hard to succeed in permanent housing and break out of the culture of homelessness and its related cycles of trauma, abuse, and abject poverty.

Several of the portraits are accompanied by printed excerpts of interviews with the tenants. A few of these interviews are available by audio.

This project is sponsored by DISH (Delivering Innovation in Supportive Housing), and was made possible with support from California Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

About Delivering Innovation in Supportive Housing (DISH)

DISH believes that everyone deserves a home. Every day, we provide high-quality, permanent housing to San Franciscans who suffer from serious health issues, enabling them to get off the streets, rebuild their lives, and strengthen their communities. DISH is a project of Tides.

Everyone Deserves a Home Exhibit – Dec.17, 2016 – March 12, 2017, Main Library, Jewett Gallery

Related programs:

Everyone Deserves a Home Opening Event – Jan. 10, 2017, 4 p.m., Main Library, Latino Hispanic Community Room
On Jan. 10, 2017, meet the participants in the photography exhibit Everyone Deserves a Home. Photographers Audra Miller, Ariel Fortune, Lauren Hall and others will discuss the storytelling aspect of the project, which explores the impact of finding a home after experiencing homelessness in San Francisco.

Everyone Deserves a Home Panel Discussion – March 1, 2017, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Moderated by Audrey Cooper, Editor-In-Chief of the San Francisco Chronicle. Featuring Jeff Kositsky, Director of the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing; Laura Guzman, Director of the Mission Neighborhood Resource Center; District 6 Supervisor Jane Kim; District 2 Supervisor Mark Farrell; Lateefah Simon, Bart Board Director; Kevin Fagan, Reporter of the San Francisco Chronicle

With Bells on, San Francisco Public Library Rings in the Holidays with Craft Programs, Annual Train Exhibit and More

For Immediate Release:
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295; Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

 

With Bells on, San Francisco Public Library Rings in the Holidays with Craft Programs, Annual Train Exhibit and More

Dec. 12, 2016 – Made in SF, San Francisco Public Library’s system-wide craft program, continues in December with programming for the whole family that celebrates the unique creative spirit that has inspired the City’s artisans and makers for decades. Branch Libraries across the city offer classes in puppet making, natural dying, holiday card and ornament crafting, jewelry designing, button making and more.

Youth programs feature opportunities to express one’s creativity, and maker programs offer rare, hands-on experiences for teens. The cure for the winter break boredom blues can be found in North Beach Branch’s button bracelets, Visitation’s felt fortune cookies, Portola Branch’s tiny terrariums and The Mix at SFPL’s cooking class featuring the Library’s mobile kitchen, Biblio Bistro.

Made in S.F. – Related craft programs for the winter break

Biblios Bistro at The Mix
Tuesday, Dec. 27, 4 p.m., The Mix at SFPL, Main Library

Felt Fortune Cookies
Wednesday, Dec. 21, 1 p.m.,  Visitacion Valley Branch Library
Friday, Dec. 30, 3 p.m., Mission Branch Library

Button Bracelets
Tuesday, Dec. 20, 3:30 p.m., North Beach Branch Library

Tiny Festival Terrariums
Wednesday, Dec 21, 6 p.m., Portola Branch Library

Visit the Main Library’s Children’s Center for a truly made in S.F labor of love: the Children’s Holiday Train Display, a custom-built exhibit by SFPL’s Facilities and Engineering staff. This year’s Holiday Train features new trains from beloved storybooks and literature, including Anne of Green Gables and Thomas the Tank Engine. The train exhibit remains on display through Jan. 6, 2017, in front of the Main Library’s Fisher Children’s Center, 2nd floor, 100 Larkin St., San Francisco.

The majestic sound of authentic bronze Russian bells will fill the San Francisco Main Library’s Koret Auditorium on Saturday, Dec. 24 as San Francisco Symphony Percussionist Victor Avdienko performs a special holiday concert. The program will include a mix of traditional liturgical and contemporary secular “zvons” (peals) and improvisations, followed by a film screening of Blagovest Bells’ A Voice of Pure Earth: The Sacred Bells of Russia.

Holiday Train Display
Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016 – Friday, Jan. 6, 2107, Main Library, Fisher Children’s Center Exhibit Space

Russian Holiday Bell Concert
Saturday, Dec. 24, 12 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Made in SF Program Guide

San Francisco librarian chosen for national public service honor – Lia Kharis Hillman recipient of the prestigious 2016 I Love My Librarian Award

For Immediate Release
Contact: Heather Cho
American Library Association
(312) 280-4020
hcho@ala.org

 

San Francisco librarian chosen for national public service honor
Lia Kharis Hillman recipient of the prestigious 2016 I Love My Librarian Award

 

NEW YORK – Today Lia Kharis Hillman, fourth floor program manager at the San Francisco Public Library, was named a winner of the I Love My Librarian Award. Hillman is being recognized for her exceptional contributions to the community and ongoing commitment to transforming lives through education and lifelong learning. Hillman is one of only 10 librarians in the country this year to receive this national honor. Two additional librarians from California are also recipients of the 2016 award: Olga Valencia Cardenas from Modesto and Sherri Ginsberg from Pasadena.

Hillman is commended for her ability to extend the role of the library to meet the needs of the community.

Hillman, a former chef, established a garden and food education program in library branches across San Francisco. When Hillman realized underserved families were facing challenges with cooking, she set out to help residents make the connection between self-prepared meals and wellness.

Through a grant, she purchased Biblio Bistro, a mobile kitchen cart on wheels to give demonstrations on cooking with inexpensive and locally grown foods. Hillman’s cooking lessons teach lifelong skills and build nutritional awareness, giving people more confidence about food preparation.

To help children gain hands-on experience growing vegetables, Hillman built a garden on one of the library’s patios. She also started a seed lending library that residents can use to start their own gardens.

Hillman will receive a $5,000 prize at an award ceremony and reception held this evening in New York City. The ceremony is hosted by Carnegie Corporation of New York, which co-sponsors the award along with The New York Public Library and The New York Times. The American Library Association administers the award through its Public Awareness Office, which promotes the value of libraries and librarians.