Celebrate Valentine’s Day with the Library

For Immediate Release:  Jan. 17, 2018
Media contact: Mindy Linetzky
(415) 557-4252; Mindy.Linetzky@sfpl.org

 

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with the Library

Romance novels, crafts, valentine printing, poetry and handkerchiefs – all free at your neighborhood library

valentines

San Francisco, CA – Looking for love this February 14? The library is always a good place to meet new people – peruse the exhibition galleries, mingle at an author talk, smile in the stacks or get crafty with your neighbors. Or if you’re just looking for a fun way to celebrate Valentine’s Day, the library’s got you covered.

The History Center at the Main Library holds its 7th Annual Valentine Broadside Printing program on Saturday, Feb. 3. Participants will create a unique keepsake on the library’s 1909 Albion hand press complete with a poem and illustration by San Francisco Poet Laureate Kim Shuck.

On Sunday, Feb. 4, Alan Blackman, San Francisco lettering artist and calligrapher, presents Letters to Myself, a discussion of the more than 200 embellished, illuminated and decorated envelopes he mailed to his son. His envelopes, with elaborate hand lettering and clever drawings directly inspired by the design of the stamps, span 40 years and bear cancellations from all over the world.

What’s more old-fashioned than handkerchiefs for Valentine’s Day? Starting Saturday, Jan. 27, the Library displays Amazing Handkerchiefs, selections from the collection of Ann Mahony, collector and historian of vintage handkerchiefs, featuring designs from the 1930s, 40s and 50s.

Want to make a personal valentine for your sweetheart? The Library offers Valentine’s Day card making programs for all ages. Adults can even hone up their computer skills on Wednesday, Feb. 7 while making a valentine in the Computer Training Center of the Main Library. See the sfpl.org calendar and the list below for specific programs.

Last, but not least, the Library offers romance novels, love stories, poetry and date-night movies free for the choosing. With your library card, you can check out or stream all your favorite romantic movies, listen to great voices reading an EBook of poetry or reminisce with your favorite vinyl album. The possibilities are infinite.

7th Annual Valentine Broadside Printing – Feb. 3, 2-4 p.m., Main Library, San Francisco History Center, 6th Floor

Alan Blackman, Letters to Myself – Feb. 4, 1 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Rooms

The Amazing Handkerchief through the AgesJan. 27- May 17, Main Library, Art, Music & Recreation Center, 4th Floor.
Related program: Handkerchief Heroes with Ann Mahony – Feb. 25, 2 p.m., Main Library, Learning Studio, 5th Floor

Valentine’s Day card making for adults

Feb. 3, 2 p.m., Marina Branch Library (preregister)

Feb. 7, 7 p.m., Noe Valley Branch Library

Feb. 7, 9:30 a.m., Valentine’s Day Cards: Use Microsoft Word to set hearts aflutter, Main Library, Computer Training Center, 5th Floor

 

Valentine’s Day card making for teens

Feb. 3, 2:30 p.m., North Beach Branch Library (preregister)

Feb. 8, 3:30 p.m., Marina Branch Library

Feb. 10, 2 p.m., West Portal Branch Library

 

Valentine’s Day crafts for children

Feb. 1, 2:30 p.m., Holiday Cards & Cotton Candy, Bernal Heights Branch Library

Feb. 8, 4 p.m., Valentine Bugs Craft, North Beach Branch Library

Feb. 10, 10:15 a.m., Valentine’s Day Cards, Presidio Branch Library

Feb. 10, 3 p.m., Valentine’s Day Cards, Portola Branch Library

Feb. 10, 4 p.m., Valentine’s Day Cards, Ingleside Branch Library

Feb. 14, 3 p.m., Valentine’s Day Cards, Merced Branch Library

 

A Game of Color – The African-American Experience in Baseball

For Immediate Release: January 10, 2018
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295; Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

 

A Game of Color
The African-American Experience in Baseball

 

SAN FRANCISCO, CA The Baseball Reliquary and the Institute for Baseball Studies present A Game of Color: The African-American Experience in Baseball, an exhibition of artifacts, artworks and photographs opening Jan. 13 in the Skylight Gallery at the San Francisco Public Library.

171220_postcard_med-resThe exhibition covers more than a half century of professional baseball, from the founding of the first Negro League in 1920 through the integration of major league baseball in 1947, and up to a new wave of outspoken African American players in the 1960s and ‘70s who challenged the baseball establishment.

Rather than a comprehensive history of African American baseball, the exhibition is intended as a general introduction, with an emphasis on key figures, teams and pivotal moments.  The artifacts and artworks which support the exhibition’s themes are being shown for the first time in San Francisco.  Included are paintings by Ben Sakoguchi and Bill Cormalis Jr., and an iconic painting of Jackie Robinson by Michael Guccione.

Exhibition Highlights:

THE NEGRO LEAGUES: Formed as a response to institutionalized racism in organized Baseball, the Negro Leagues were comprised primarily of African American players and became a vibrant business enterprise in Black America.  The displays offer a glimpse into the heyday of the Negro Leagues, from 1920-1946.

BARNSTORMING AS A WAY OF LIFE: During the offseason, Negro League players often joined barnstorming teams, traveling the highways and byways of America in order to make enough money to survive.  The displays feature the colorful history of these teams, from the Satchel Paige All-Stars to the Zulu Cannibal Giants.

PIONEERS OF INTEGRATION: Spotlighting several prominent figures who lobbied steadily and vociferously for the integration of baseball, including maverick owner Bill Veeck and pioneering journalist Lester Rodney.

JACKIE ROBINSON AND EMMETT ASHFORD: Highlighting Jackie Robinson’s pioneering role as the first African American to officially play in the major leagues in the 20th century and his status as the most important professional baseball player in postwar America.  Also featured is Emmett Ashford, the first African American umpire to officiate in the minor leagues in 1951 and in the major leagues in 1966.

A NEW ACTIVISM IN THE POST-JACKIE ERA: Looking at the decades immediately following baseball’s integration, the displays spotlight several players who shattered the complacency of the baseball establishment and confronted management with charges of discrimination, especially with regard to the lack of black managers and front-office personnel.

The exhibit and all events are co-sponsored by Friends of the San Francisco Public Library and the Lefty O’Doul Chapter of the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) and The Baseball Reliquary.

Exhibit: A Game of ColorJan. 13 – March 18, Main Library, Skylight Gallery

Opening event

Film screening of Only the Ball Was White followed by Terry Cannon, exhibit curator and former major league player Nate Oliver discussing the African American experience in baseball. 
Only the Ball Was White – Film and Discussion — Sunday, Jan. 28, 1 p.m. Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Related programs:

Called Up: The Emmett Ashford Story – Film and DiscussionFeb. 7, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Beyond Branch Rickey: The Hidden Forces Behind the Breaking of Baseball’s Color BarrierFeb. 21, 6:30 p.m., Main Library, Latino Hispanic Community Room

A Long Way from Home: The Untold Story of Baseball’s Desegregation – Film and DiscussionFeb. 27, 6 p.m. Main Library, Koret Auditorium

No No: A Documentary – Film and DiscussionMarch 8, 6 p.m. Main Library, Koret Auditorium

World Series of Baseball Poetry with San Francisco Poet Laureate Kim Shuck, Jack Hirshman and others March 1, 6 p.m., Main Library, Latino Hispanic Community Room

About The Baseball Reliquary

A Pasadena, California-based nonprofit, educational organization dedicated to fostering an appreciation of American art and culture through the context of baseball history and to exploring the national pastime’s unparalleled creative possibilities.  Its exhibitions and programs are supported, in part, by a grant from the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Arts Commission.  The Institute for Baseball Studies, a collaborative effort of Whittier College and the Baseball Reliquary, fosters an intellectual community for creating and supporting interdisciplinary research and studies related to the cultural significance of baseball in American history.  Housed on the campus of Whittier College in Whittier, California, the Institute for Baseball Studies is the first humanities-based research center of its kind associated with a college or university in the United States.

More Than A Month – The Library celebrates Black history, culture and heritage

For Immediate Release: January 9, 2018
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295; Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

 

More Than A Month

The Library celebrates Black history, culture and heritage

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – morethanamonth_program-coverBlack History Month is an integral part of our nation’s tradition in which we promote affirmative examples of important historical events, honorable leaders and steps towards collective change. This year, the Library has titled the programs that celebrate Black history, culture & heritage More Than a Month in an effort to emphasize that reflection, open dialogue, interdisciplinary education and shared advocacy needs to take place in our communities every month, all year round.

Beginning on Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday weekend and throughout February, the Library champions Black history, culture & heritage with special music, dance, crafts and storytelling events at every branch in the City. More Than a Month features film screenings and literary events for adults, interactive events for teens, hands-on activities for kids and exhibits, music and craft classes for the whole family.

Visit the African American Center in the Main Library to learn about historical, political and cultural experiences of African Americans in California and beyond. In addition to housing a collection of reference materials spanning a broad range of subject areas, the Center organizes many free exhibits and programs.

“All year long we invite you to join us every day, in every library location,” says library spokesperson Katherine Jardine, “to continue honoring and celebrating the diverse and special histories and heritages that make up our beloved City and our unique country.”

All programs and exhibits are free and open to the public. More information, including the program guide, at sfpl.org/more-than-a-month.

Program highlights:

The Black Comix Arts Festival – Jan. 14, Main Library, Koret Auditorium

I Am Alfonso Jones Comic Arts Demo – Jan. 13, Main Library, Latino Hispanic Room

Jazz Performance by Six Roses – Jan. 13, Anza

Hambone, History and Humor with Unique Derique – Jan. 13, Marina & North Beach

Kirk Waller – African and African-American Stories – Jan. 19 Portola & Jan. 20 Main Library, Children’s Center

African Dance with Moeketsi Gibe – Jan. 20, Park

African Drumming with Moeketsi Gibe – Jan. 20, Mission

Musician Rado with Kids Music SF – Jan. 13, Noe Valley, Jan. 23, Golden Gate & Sunset

Charlottesville, Anthem Protest and Race – Jan. 24, Park

Talking with Kids About Race: Nurturing Justice – Jan. 27, Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Film Screening: Moonlight – Jan. 27, Western Addition

Asheba, Musical Storyteller – Jan. 27, Ocean View

Exhibits

If Superpowers Could Save My Community – Beginning Jan. 6, Main Library, African American Center

A Game of Color – Beginning Jan. 13, Main Library, Skylight Gallery

City Librarian Luis Herrera Announces Retirement

For Immediate Release:  December 28, 2017
Media contact: Mindy Linetzky
(415) 557-4252; Mindy.Linetzky@sfpl.org

City Librarian Luis Herrera Announces Retirement

San Francisco, CA – Luis Herrera, City Librarian of the San Francisco Public Library, announced his retirement, effective late February 2018.

“Today is a bittersweet day,” began the message sent to all staff by Herrera.  “Together, we have ensured that the San Francisco Public Library remains a welcoming, vital and integral part of San Francisco life.”

Herrera’s tenure ushered in a new era of library service – one with increased equity and access.  The branch libraries were transformed through the Branch Library Improvement Program, spaces were repurposed at the Main Library to create The Mix teen digital center and The Bridge at Main literacy and learning center, and numerous partnerships were formed to foster myriad learning opportunities, innovative and accessible programs and civic engagement for San Francisco residents.  Most recently, Herrera worked with Mayor Ed Lee to ensure that all San Francisco libraries are open seven days a week.

luis-1Herrera has held various positions in the library profession for more than 40 years. In 2012, he was named the Librarian of the Year by Library Journal magazine. Before coming to San Francisco, Herrera served as the Director of Information Services for Pasadena Public Library and the Deputy Director of the San Diego and Long Beach Library systems in California.  He has served as President of both the Public Library Association and the California Library Association and is currently a member of the Board of Trustees for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Herrera is the immediate past Chair of Cal Humanities and served on the Board of the Digital Public Library of America.  He was also appointed by President Barack Obama to serve on the Board of the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Following Herrera’s departure, the Mayor’s Office plans to appoint Deputy City Librarian Michael Lambert as Acting City Librarian. Lambert has been Deputy City Librarian since March 2014 and has served in four urban libraries during his more than 25 year career. The San Francisco Department of Human Resources will work with a recruitment firm on a national search for a replacement. The Library Commission will vet candidates and forward suggested names to the Mayor for appointment. In the past, this process has taken several months.

About San Francisco Public Library:
San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

Joyce Carol Oates on It Occurs to Me That I Am America

For Immediate Release:  December 13, 2017
Media contact: Mindy Linetzky
(415) 557-4252; Mindy.Linetzky@sfpl.org

Joyce Carol Oates on It Occurs to Me That I Am America

In time for the one-year anniversary of the Trump inauguration and the Women’s March

oates

San Francisco, CA –San Francisco Public Library is proud to host author Joyce Carol Oates in conversation with editor Jonathan Santlofer, at the Main Library on January 23, 2018. They will discuss It Occurs To Me That I Am America:  New Stories and Art, a provocative, unprecedented anthology, featuring original short stories from thirty bestselling and award-winning authors—including Alice Walker, Richard Russo, Walter Mosley, Joyce Carol Oates, Alice Hoffman, Neil Gaiman, Michael Cunningham, Mary Higgins Clark, and Lee Child—with an introduction by Pulitzer Prize–winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen.

When Donald Trump claimed victory last November, the U.S. literary world erupted in indignation. Many of America’s leading writers and artists openly resist the current administration’s dogma and earliest policy moves, and they’re not about to go gently into that good night. In It Occurs to Me That I Am America: New Stories and Art, more than thirty of the most acclaimed modern writers consider the fundamental ideals of a free, just and compassionate democracy—through fiction.

Featuring artwork by some of today’s best known artists, cartoonists, and graphic novelists—including Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Marilyn Minter and Eric Fischl—who cover political, social and cultural issues, this anthology is a beautiful, enduring collection that will resonate with anyone concerned with the contest for our American soul.

The book “aims to address the anxiety many Americans are feeling about losing the freedoms for which we’ve fought; to remind us of America as an international symbol of hope; and considers the most basic notion of all: what it means to be an American” says Jonathan Santlofer.

Joyce Carol Oates is the author most recently of the novel A Book of American Martyrs and the story collection DIS MEM BER. She is a recipient of the National Book Award, the National Humanities Medal, the PEN/Malamud Award in Short Fiction, and a Lifetime Achievement Award from PEN America, among other honors. She has been a professor at Princeton University for many years and is currently Visiting Distinguished Writer in Residence in the Graduate Writing Program at New York University; in the spring term she is Visiting Professor of English at University of California, Berkeley. Her forthcoming novel is Hazards of Time Travel.

Jonathan Santlofer is the award-winning crime fiction author of The Death Artist and Anatomy of Fear, and the editor of Inherit the Dead, The Dark End of the Street, and LA Noire: The Collected Stories. His memoir, The Widower’s Notebook, will be published in July 2018.

A book sale by Friends of the San Francisco Public Library follows the event.

Joyce Carol Oates and Jonathan Santlofer:  It Occurs to Me That I Am America – Tuesday, January 23, 6:30 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St.

Gifts that Keep on Giving at the San Francisco Public Library

For Immediate Release: Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017
Media Contact: Katherine Jardine
(415) 557-4295; Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

Gifts that Keep on Giving at the San Francisco Public Library

greengifts

San Francisco, CA – This holiday season, add a personal, handmade touch to gift-giving by upcycling with the Library. SFPL is excited to be offering free workshops and events about green ideas and environmentally sustainable practices during the month of December. Transform old books and magazines, T-shirts and sweaters, and bottles and jars into cup cozies, mixed media wreaths, sugar scrubs and more.

Libraries throughout the City are hosting Green Gifts workshops for kids, teens and adults, focusing on crafting seasonal presents and decorations using repurposed materials. The workshops help patrons learn to create less waste by providing innovative and fun ways to utilize the three Rs: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle.

Patrons can try their hand at weaving newspaper baskets, folding origami trees, creating paper ornaments, fabric flowers, T-shirt tote bags and much more. For more information, view the complete program guide, and visit sfpl.org/GreenGifts.

For additional, and year-round, eco-friendly resources and programs at the Library, visit the Wallace Stegner Environmental Center at the Main Library.

Green Gifts – Program Highlights:

Crafting with Recycled Books – Dec. 2 & 3, West Portal

Mixed Media Wreaths – Dec. 5, Anza

Adult Craft Night: Sugar Scrubs and Holiday Cards – Dec. 6, Noe Valley

Holiday Upcycling – Dec. 7, Excelsior

Children’s Craft: Calming Jars – Dec. 9, Western Addition

Fingerless Gloves with GoGo Craft – Dec. 13, Portola

TAY Day in the Hormel Center – Dec. 18, Main Library, Hormel Center

Craft Night: Snow Globes & Gift Tags – Dec. 20, Ortega

Ring in the Holidays at the Library – Music, craft programs, toy trains and more – all free at your neighborhood library

For Immediate Release:  Nov. 29, 2017
Media contact: Mindy Linetzky
(415) 557-4252; Mindy.Linetzky@sfpl.org

Ring in the Holidays at the Library

Music, craft programs, toy trains and more – all free at your neighborhood library

holiday

San Francisco, CA – San Francisco Public Library is the place to bring your friends and family for free holiday fun this season. There’s craft making, holiday music, special exhibits, food demonstrations and much more – all free.

Kick off the season with Bright Star – Music and More, a special musical pop-up event for children and families at the Main Library on Saturday, Dec. 2, at 3:30 pm. The program is centered on the Curran Theater’s new production, “Bright Star,” a musical written by Steve Martin and Edie Brickell. The library will host a performance by bluegrass band Alabamajama, and a star-making craft where kids and families will have the chance to express themselves around the theme of “If You Knew My Story,” one of the songs from the musical.

The Holiday Train display also revs its engines on Dec. 2 and runs through Jan. 4 in front of the Children’s Center in the Main Library.  Train engineers of all ages can push the levers that make the trains travel the tracks in a sparkling custom-built winter wonderland.

During December, libraries across the City are holding Green Gifts workshops for kids, teens and adults, focusing on crafting seasonal presents and decorations using repurposed materials. Transform old books and magazines, T-shirts, sweaters, bottles and jars into cup cozies, mixed media wreaths and sugar scrubs. Participants can try their hand at weaving newspaper baskets, folding origami trees, creating paper ornaments, fabric flowers, T-shirt tote bags and much more.

The majestic sound of authentic bronze Russian Holiday Bells will fill the Main Library’s Koret Auditorium on Saturday, Dec. 23 as San Francisco Symphony Percussionist Victor Avdienko performs a special holiday concert. The concert will include several traditional chimes, a few contemporary pieces and improvisations, followed by a film screening of Blagovest Bells’ A Voice of Pure Earth: The Sacred Bells of Russia.

Plus, libraries are good places to take family or friends during the holidays. They can gather around the fireplaces at Eureka Valley or Merced branch libraries; meditate while walking the stone pavers marked with West African Adinkra symbols in the courtyard of the Bayview branch; see Herb Caen’s original typewriter at the North Beach branch; and view historical photos in the serene History Center at the Main Library. Out of town guests can take the cable car to the Chinatown branch; view the amazing City skyline from the Potrero branch windows; or just cozy up with a good book or magazine in the leather chairs at the Presidio branch. Folks from colder climates will enjoy the special gardens behind the Noe Valley, Ingleside and Western Addition branches.

Or just check out a good book, a calming CD, a seasonal video and enjoy the holidays!

 

Holiday highlights:

Bright Star – Music and More with the Curran Theater – Saturday, December 2, 3:30 p.m., Main Library, Children’s Center, 2nd floor

Green Gifts – various library locations and dates, see program guide.

Russian Holiday Bells – Saturday, December 23, 12 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St.

Biblio Bistro cooking demonstration – Wednesday, December 20, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m., Heart of the City Farmer’s Market, UN Plaza (weather permitting)

A Muslim Family’s Chair for the Pope exhibit – through Jan. 31, Main Library, Children’s Center, 2nd floor

Kwanzaa – Celebrating Kuumba (Infinite Creativity) – Sunday, December 31, 1 – 3 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St.

Free Opera Talk – Girls of the Golden West

For Immediate Release:  Nov. 17, 2017
Media contact: Mindy Linetzky
(415) 557-4252; Mindy.Linetzky@sfpl.org

Free Opera Talk – Girls of the Golden West

Soprano Julia Bullock, dramaturg Kip Cranna and author Marlene Smith-Branzini appear at the library

opera

San Francisco, CA –San Francisco Public Library is hosting a free, public discussion presented by the San Francisco Opera about Dame Shirley, whose book, The Shirley Letters, inspired this season’s opera premiere, Girls of the Golden West.

San Francisco Opera Dramaturg Dr. Clifford “Kip” Cranna will moderate the discussion with soprano Julia Bullock, who portrays Dame Shirley in the new opera, and Louise Clappe expert Marlene Smith-Baranzini. The event is free.

The talk is being held in connection with the library’s On the Same Page bimonthly book club. The November/December selection is The Shirley Letters.

 

Program:             Opera Talk – Girls of the Golden West

Date:                     Tuesday, Nov. 28

Time:                     6 p.m.

Place:                    Main Library, 100 Larkin St., Koret Auditorium

Cost:                      Free

 

The new opera, Girls of the Golden West, by John Adams with a libretto by Peter Sellars is based on The Shirley Letters, a collection of 23 letters written by Clappe to her sister in Massachusetts detailing life in a Gold Rush-era mining camp in the mid-1800s.

The On the Same Page selection is based on the Heydey Publishing edition of The Shirley Letters, edited and introduced by Marlene Smith-Baranzini. The series of letters written by Clappe to her sister were first published under the pseudonym of “Dame Shirley” in Pioneer magazine. In these letters Clappe writes of life in San Francisco and the Feather River mining communities of Rich Bar and Indian Bar in 1851 and 1852. She focuses on the experiences of women and children, the perils of miners’ work, crime and punishment, and relations with native Hispanic residents and Native Americans. Bret Harte is said to have based two of his stories on The Shirley Letters.

San Francisco Opera Presents Girls of the Golden West – Tuesday, November 28, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St.

Related program:

Hands on History: Girls (and Some Guys) of the Golden West – Saturday, December 2, 2 p.m., Main Library, San Francisco History Center, 6th Floor

SF Veterans Film Festival 2017 Showcases Real Stories of U.S. Military and Veteran Men and Women

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday, October 30, 2017

SFVVF Contact: Pamela Coddington
Phone: (415) 299-0251
Email: pamela@coddingtonpr.com

SFPL Contact: Katherine Jardine
Phone: (415) 544-4295
Email: Katherine.Jardine@sfpl.org

 

San Francisco Veterans Film Festival 2017 Showcases Real Stories
of U.S. Military and Veteran Men and Women

vetfilm

WHAT:                 6th Annual San Francisco Veterans Film Festival

WHEN:                   Saturday, Dec. 2, 10 a.m. -5:30 p.m.                                                                                           Sunday, Dec. 3, 12 – 4:30 p.m.

WHERE:               Koret Auditorium, San Francisco Main Library,                                                                       100 Larkin Street, SF (Grove Street entrance)

Admission is free

San Francisco, CA —OneVet OneVoice announces the lineup for their 6th annual San Francisco Veterans Film Festival (#SFVFF17), the Bay Area’s premier military and veteran film event and the non-profit’s yearly public education event, hosted by the San Francisco Public Library. The film festival shares the real stories of service men and women as well as veterans, unfiltered by Hollywood, while educating the community at large. The full line of screenings and panel discussions will be available online at www.sfveteransfilmfestival.org.

San Francisco Veterans Film Festival (#SFVFF17) offers a rare opportunity for Veterans to find support while allowing the general population to learn about the issues facing the 1% of the American population that serves in the United States active duty military forces.  These men and women are more often becoming part of San Francisco’ growing veteran community since California has the largest population of veterans in the United States (1.9 million men and women of all ages). Today’s veterans are facing a mental health crisis that has resulted in more deaths by suicide than in active duty.  It is estimated that 20 U.S. veterans commit suicide each day.

The 2-day festival includes 13 films made by veterans, veteran families, independent filmmakers and students. This year’s animations, dramas and documentary short and feature length films include unique points of view on a range of situations. Stories this year range from the emotional support shared between the members of a group of Gold Star families and the challenges facing caregivers to how the emotional damage dramatized by a veteran coping with the VA benefits repayment issue, or from why we have a mental health crisis facing our Veterans to ways some veterans are healing from emotional, moral and physical injuries after deployment.

“Each year we showcase films that provide the public with a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by the men and women who serve our country, building empathy for our veterans,” comments Eddie Ramirez, founder of the San Francisco Veterans Film Festival and the sponsoring organization OneVet OneVoice. “The program of films and speakers provides real stories of struggles as well as real solutions, helping veterans in attendance while educating the broader community, which supports healing by making a smoother transition back to home, family and work.”

The 2017 program is free of charge to the public and offers film screenings, panel discussions with both filmmakers and experts from organizations that provide support to veterans, and special events that celebrate the filmmakers. Saturday attendees are invited to the evening’s Filmmakers Reception. The 2017 programming is possible thanks to a generous grant from the California Arts Council and the support of the San Francisco Public Library.

Films in the 2017 San Francisco Veterans Film Festival include the following:

 After Fire (1 hr 30 min) Brittany Huckabee
With intimate access to the lives of three Latina women veterans, this film is an observational documentary that throws a spotlight on the human toll of military service – including military sexual trauma, combat injuries and bureaucratic dysfunction – telling a universal story about strength in the aftermath of trauma.

Battlefield: Home – Breaking the Silence (1 hr 8 min) Anita Sugimura Holsapple
A Vietnam era military child speaks with multi-generational family members and exposes the unflinching aftermath of war, and the failing systems that continue the legacy of trauma from generation to generation.

Brass Razoo (8 min 42 sec) Rupert Raineri
Brass Razoo is a dramatic character study based on the return of a fictional soldier and his adjustment to reality after his time in Afghanistan.

Dance of Death: The fatal fandango of war and healthcare (4 min ) Mark Pinto and Patricia Lee Stotter
This film presents the country’s failure to heal moral injury and support our warriors through their fiercest battle of all—saving their souls on the home front. The film is part of a larger work-in-process, Paging Dr. Faustus.

Devil Dogs (23 min 30 sec) director Lindsay Holt
This dramatic short film profiles an American photojournalist as he struggles with his assignment – and his emotions – when embedded with a team of U.S. Marines during fierce urban combat in the deadliest battle of the Iraq War, the fight for Fallujah in 2004.

Gold Star (7 min 24 sec) James Giese, Josh Wheat
A documentary that looks into the Colorado Gold Star Parents Weekend and provides insights into what it means to become a Gold Star Parent, and the bond that is formed between them.

Honor Flight: Vietnam (29 min 53 sec) Ross Raventos
A documentary that follows the Honor Flight program in Kern County as it takes its first group of Vietnam Veterans to Washington, DC to see their memorial.

Love Separated In Life…Love Reunited in Honor (14 min 27 sec)
Jackie Wright

Crossing history, time, social mores and seas, the documentary follows the Wright siblings as they honor Sp5 Wyley Wright Jr. and ‘the wife of his youth,’ Ouida Fay McClendon Wright with a ceremony in Arlington National Cemetery, after exhuming him from a segregated cemetery in Jacksonville, Florida fifty years after his death. The ceremony ultimately leads the Wrights to Vietnam, where they found the land in Vinh Long, Vietnam that had been named after their father.

Simple Solution (8 min 15 sec) Arturo Mireles
On October 24, 2016 the news broke that some veterans needed to pay back their enlistment bonuses. This film is a dramatization of one veteran as he is dealing with the news using alcohol and his skills in a new environment and state of mind.

Ten Thousand Miles (21 min) Nathan Ellis
When the worst happens in combat, soldiers rely on their team for survival…but what does it take to survive the worst back home? This dramatic short explores one story.

Thank You For Your Service (1 hr 41 min) Tom Donahue
Thank You For Your Service tackles the mental health crisis in the military and addresses specific solutions to reducing stigmas both within the military and as a larger cultural and societal context. The documentary also tells the story of incredibly resilient Veterans whose struggles and triumphs are chronicled in the film.  With interviews from the leaders of our military and our government, as well as mental health professionals, non-profit leaders and Veterans and their families.

The Catcher (3 min 7 sec) Cassie Guidry
Animated short film about a soldier suffering with PTSD who seeks the aid of a Dreamcatcher Weaver to save him from his nightmares.

The Weight of Honor (56 min) Stephanie Seldin Howard
For five years, a documentary filmmaker followed the story of the devastating effects that caring for a severely wounded Veteran can have on caregivers, families and relationships. The film was made to challenge conventional notions of caregivers, and to ignite change.

About the San Francisco Veterans Film Festival
San Francisco Veterans Film Festival (#SFVFF17) is a robust forum for Veterans and civilian filmmakers to express their creativity and to share their stories, which in turn helps further healing and brings greater awareness to the public on the challenges our nation’s veteran’s face. The annual festival spotlights both veteran and civilian filmmakers addressing issues about Veterans and military-related topics.  For more information please visit www.sfveteransfilmfestival.org.

About OneVet OneVoice
OneVet OneVoice is a non-profit based in San Francisco founded on the belief that healthcare, education, housing and employees for veterans and military families should be inextricably linked together.  The organization is known for the San Francisco Veterans Town Hall Collaborative.  The goal of the San Francisco Veterans Film Festival is to support one of the key missions of OneVet OneVoice: to educate the general public about the current issues facing our veterans, and provide a place for veterans to learn more about current support available.

About the San Francisco Public Library’s Veterans Resource Center
San Francisco Public Library’s Veterans Resource Center, located on the 5th floor of the Main Library, supports the veteran community with free computer access, a specialized veterans book collection, and information and assistance for veterans and their family. For more information please visit www.sfpl.org/veterans

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The Irrepressible Politics of the Black Panther Party – Authors Joshua Bloom and Waldo Martin in conversation with “Davey D” Cook

For Immediate Release:  October 26, 2017
Media contact: Mindy Linetzky
(415) 557-4252; Mindy.Linetzky@sfpl.org

The Irrepressible Politics of the Black Panther Party

Authors Joshua Bloom and Waldo Martin in conversation with “Davey D” Cook

One City One Book

San Francisco, CA – The San Francisco Public Library is excited to bring to the stage the authors of San Francisco’s One City One Book selection for 2017: Black against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party. Facilitated by journalist “Davey D” Cook, authors Joshua Bloom and Waldo E. Martin, Jr. will discuss the dynamics of the Black Panther Party and reflect on the movement’s link to today’s struggles.

Program:             One City One Book Authors in Conversation

Date:                     Sunday, Oct. 29

Time:                     1 p.m.

Place:                    Main Library, 100 Larkin St., Koret Auditorium

Cost:                      Free

Black against Empire is the first comprehensive overview and analysis of the history and politics of the Black Panther Party. Bold, engrossing, and richly detailed, the book cuts through the mythology and obfuscation, revealing the political dynamics that drove the explosive growth of this revolutionary movement and its disastrous unraveling.

“Black people in cities throughout the North and West were yearning for ways to stand up to police brutality and persistent racism. For several years, the Black Panther Party set the standard,” says co-author Bloom. “Waldo and I wrote the book to make sense of the how and why. Those questions are as vital now as they were in the late 1960s – as a new generation of activists seeks to challenge racism, authoritarianism, and many forms of oppression.”

Black against Empire, published by the University of California Press, is the winner of the American Book Award. The book has been banned by the CA Department of Corrections and CA inmates are currently forbidden to possess or read it. Copies of Black against Empire are featured in all San Francisco libraries and at bookstores around the city.

About the authors

Joshua Bloom is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh. He studies the dynamics of insurgent practice and social transformation. He is the co-editor of Working for Justice: The L.A. Model of Organizing and Advocacy. Waldo E. Martin, Jr., is the Alexander F. and May T. Morrison Professor of History and Citizenship at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of No Coward Soldiers: Black Cultural Politics in Postwar America, Brown v. Board of Education: A Brief History with Documents and The Mind of Frederick Douglass.

About One City One Book

One City One Book: San Francisco Reads is an annual citywide literary event that encourages members of the San Francisco community to read the same book at the same time and then discuss it in book groups and at events throughout the City. By building bridges between communities and generations through the reading and most importantly the discussion of – one book, we hope to help to make reading a lifelong pursuit and to build a more literate society. Sponsors for One City One Book include the San Francisco Public Library and Friends of the San Francisco Public Library. The program is also supported by many bookstore partners, program partners and media sponsors.

View the complete One City One Book program guide here and visit sfpl.org/onecityonebook for more information.

One City One Book Authors in Conversation – Oct. 29, 1 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium. Book sale and signing to follow.