Never-before-seen Images and Untold Stories of the Alcatraz Occupation

For Immediate Release: November 12, 2019

Kate Patterson, San Francisco Public Library
(415) 557-4252 / kate.patterson@sfpl.org

Never-before-seen Images and Untold Stories of the Alcatraz Occupation

Original occupiers, co-conspirators, eye witnesses and artists capture the Occupation of Alcatraz through storytelling, public programs and exhibitions at San Francisco Public Library

HIGH RES IMAGES

San Francisco – In the late 60s, LaNada Means, now Dr. LaNada War Jack (Shoshone Bannock), made history when she became the first Native American to attend UC Berkeley where she started the first Native American Student Organization and joined in the Third World Strikes to advocate for the very first Ethnic Studies Department in the nation. Protesting alongside her was German-born Ilka Hartmann, a grad student at Cal and a photographer for the student newspaper, The Daily Cal. In November 1969, Hartmann saw a headline on the front page of the newspaper, “14 Indians took a boat to Alcatraz Island during the middle of the night”. On that boat was 23-year-old War Jack who was on a mission to reclaim Native land and to create Thunderbird University that would include a cultural center, museum and ecology center. This instead turned the political agenda for Native people from the termination era and inspired self-determination for Indigenous Peoples. From the moment she read the headline, Hartmann faithfully followed the occupation and on March 30, 1970, she was able to get to the island. How she got there is another story.

These are just two of the interwoven lives and first-hand accounts that are being shared in a series of public programs and exhibitions presented by San Francisco Public Library in conjunction with the 2019 One City One Book selection, There There by Tommy Orange and in honor of National American Indian Heritage Month, the 50th Anniversary of the Occupation of Alcatraz and the citywide 2019 American Indian Initiative.

“It’s important for institutions like the Public Library to provide platforms for Indigenous voices so that we can share our history—our real history, the history of genocide and forcibly removing children from their families into government and Christian boarding schools and forced assimilation,” says Dr. War Jack. “Sharing our truth enables us to breakdown the racial stereotypes that keep us all from realizing racial equity. The Occupation of Alcatraz was a catalyzing moment for Indigenous people and for reconnecting to a greater awareness of Indigenous culture. It’s wonderful to see public institutions convene the community around this significant anniversary and for the public to access a true and authentic history of our people.”

Some 50 programs for all ages in all library locations provide a platform for the community to learn about and enjoy Indigenous culture, history, music, crafts, dance and ways of life. Upcoming program highlights include the following:

Untold and Intimate Stories of the Alcatraz Occupation

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 5-8 PM

San Francisco Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Rooms
100 Larkin Street, San Francisco

The Library partners with the California Historical Society for a powerful evening of stories from the Occupation of Alcatraz. Photographer Ilka Hartmann will open the program with a slide show of images she took of the occupation in 1970.  A group of original occupiers, including Dr. LaNada War Jack (Shoshone Bannock), Eloy Martinez (Southern Ute), Geneva Seaboy (Dakota/Chippewa) and Blair Ryan (Seminole/Chickasaw) and William Ryan (Seminole/Chickasaw) will tell the rich, untold stories of organizing and living on the Island. They will be joined by Kent Blansett (Cherokee/Creek/Choctaw/Shawnee/Potawatomi), professor and author of A Journey to Freedom: Richard Oakes, Alcatraz, and Red Power and Mary Crowley, one of the three skippers, known as the Sausalito Indian Navy, who ferried the protestors to the Island. Additionally, the program will include never-before-seen photographs taken during the first nine days of the occupation by fellow navy man Brooks Townes.

Author Talk: Dr. LaNada War Jack

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 3 PM

San Francisco Main Library, Skylight Gallery, South Salon, 6th Floor
100 Larkin Street, San Francisco

Dr. LaNada War Jack (Shoshone Bannock Tribes) discusses her new book Native Resistance: an Intergenerational Fight for Survival and Life, which chronicles the events tied to the genocide of Native people in the United States—from forced removals to federal reservations and her life during the late sixties at UC Berkeley, the Occupation of Alcatraz Island, Pyramid Lake Water War in Nevada, to the Standing Rock Resistance in North Dakota

Author Talk: Kent Blansett

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 4-5 PM

San Francisco Main Library, Skylight Gallery Lobby, South Salon, 6th Floor
100 Larkin Street, San Francisco

Professor and author Kent Blansett (Cherokee/Creek/Choctaw/Shawnee/Potawatomi) discusses his book A Journey to Freedom: Richard Oakes, Alcatraz, and Red Power. Book signing to follow.

In addition, patrons can learn about the Occupation through photographic and art exhibitions at the Main Library. Occupy Alcatraz! draws on materials from the Alcatraz Indian Occupation collection donated to the Library by Indians of All Tribes. Before the Occupation: A Brief History of Native Americans at Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary gives the backstory on events in federal history that led to the Occupation.  The Native Reclamation of Alcatraz Island, 1969: News Coverage from 50 Years Ago on the Alcatraz Takeover features coverage of this landmark moment from daily newspapers and from the underground press. All that Glitters Is Not Gold: Original Ink Drawings Inspired by the Photo Archives features a new body of work by local artist Kaytea Petro. Lastly, Red Power on Alcatraz: Perspectives 50 Years Later tells the story of the 19-month occupation, a watershed moment in the movement for Native American civil rights.

Throughout the branch libraries, there are compelling programs led by Indigenous artists and instructors that include identifying edible, wild and native foods in the Bay Area with a local chef as well as book clubs centered around the Library’s 2019 One City One Book selection, There There by Tommy Orange. San Francisco Poet Laureate Kim Shuck (Tsalagi Cherokee/Euro-American) and special guests will also host Thursday evening PoemJams. Younger audiences can celebrate Indigenous culture, diversity and history through Mayan Yucatec bingo games, Ohlone games and mini-zines, making beaded bracelets and special story hours.

All ages can study Cherokee and Hawaiian online through Mango Languages, free with a library card.

We hope that you learn something new, have your curiosity stoked and enjoy our varied programs that honor and celebrate Indigenous peoples.

Visit sfpl.org for a full program of events related to the 50th Anniversary of the Occupation of Alcatraz and National American Indian Heritage Month.

About San Francisco Public Library:

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles. To learn more, please visit sfpl.org and follow on Twitter @SFPublicLibrary and on Instagram @sfpubliclibrary.

The Real Rosie the Riveters Finally Get Their Time in the Spotlight

For Immediate Release: October 30, 2019

Kate Patterson, San Francisco Public Library
(415) 557-4252 / kate.patterson@sfpl.org

The Real Rosie the Riveters Finally Get Their Time in the Spotlight

San Francisco Main Library Jewett Gallery Opens Remarkable WWII Rosie Featuring 60 Images and Stories from the Women who Helped Win the War

San Francisco – Local artist and curator Carol Witten became fascinated with Rosie the Riveter when she met Rosie. Her interest turned into a passion and for three years she made it her mission to travel the country capturing the images and stories of the Rosies, many of whom in their 90s and 100s, whose contributions were essential to winning World War II, but are largely unknown and under celebrated. Remarkable WWII Rosie, on view starting November 9 at the San Francisco Main Library Jewett Gallery, invites visitors to experience the courage and heroism of these trailblazers who opened the door to the emancipation of women and their participation in the workforce.

“This exhibition beautifully reveals Carol Witten’s style of combining traditional portraiture with narrative. Through the women’s stories, we hear the hammers and watch the soot fall as Rosie reveals the danger, sexism and racism she endured and overcame to become an American feminist icon,” says San Francisco Public Library Curator Joan Jasper.

Between 1942 and 1945, millions of women mobilized and joined the war effort building some 297,000 airplanes, billions of rounds of ammunition, 757 Liberty Ships, 102,000 tanks and 88,000 ships. When the deadliest conflict in human history came to an end on August 15, 1945, Rosies were handed a pink slip and encouraged by the government to return to work in the home. The records of their historical contributions all but disappeared or were destroyed until the 1960s when, inspired by Betty Friedan’s revolutionary Feminine Mystique, women started to reclaim their history and assert that the war would not have been won without Rosie.

According to Witten, “My goal for this exhibition is to raise awareness about their immeasurable contribution to society and to garner them the recognition and honor they deserve.”

As Remarkable WWII Rosie chronicles, in the 90s, through a second wave of activism, more permanent tributes to Rosie emerged. After years of silence, Navy Certified Journeyman Welder Phyllis Gould and her fellow riveter Mae Krier, whose portrait is in the show, lobbied Congress to recognize Rosie. Thanks to their efforts, since 2016 Congress set aside March 21 as National Rosie Day. Mae and Phyllis continue to lobby for a permanent national holiday and the Congressional Medal of Freedom.

Realizing that there is still a sizeable community of WWII Rosies in her district, Richmond City Councilwoman Donna Power lobbies Congress and mounts a grassroots campaign to establish The Rosie the Riveter Visitors Center under the National Park Service and erect the nation’s first Rosie the Riveter Memorial. On the east coast, Dr. Frances Carter, herself a riveter, founds the American Rosie Riveter Association in 1998 as a forum for Rosies to connect with one another and share wartime experiences. Today, the organization has over 5,000 members scattered throughout the country and inspires new generations to fall in love with WWII Rosie.

EXHIBITION DETAILS:

World War II icon Rosie the Riveter has held the American imagination for over half a century. In a new exhibition, Remarkable WWII Rosie, local artist Carol Witten shows 60 digital prints (diptychs) developed from her travels cross country to Rosie Conventions and local Rosie Rallies. Witten’s works are composed from interviews and photographs of women, now 90- and 100-years-old and over, who built the planes, ships and ammunition that enabled America to win the War.

On view Nov. 9–Jan. 26, 2020, Main Library, Jewett Gallery

Opening event and discussion with photographer Carol Witten – Nov. 23, 3p.m., Main Library, Jewett Gallery

About San Francisco Public Library:

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

To learn more, please visit sfpl.org and follow on Twitter @SFPublicLibrary and on Instagram @sfpubliclibrary.

Eminent Diverse Authors Recognized at American Book Awards Ceremony

For Immediate Release: 10/29/19
Media Contact: Jaime Wong
(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT

Invitation to Cover


Eminent Diverse Authors Recognized at American Book Awards Ceremony

San Francisco Public Library Hosts Program at Main Library

WHAT: The Before Columbus Foundation recognizes the winners of the 40th Annual American Book Awards. The American Book Awards were created to provide recognition for outstanding literary achievement from the entire spectrum of America’s diverse literary community.

WHEN: 1 p.m.–4 p.m., Friday, November 1, 2019

WHERE: Koret Auditorium, Main Library, 100 Larkin St.

WHO: Notable authors May-Lee Chai (Useful Phrases for Immigrants: Stories), G. Willow Wilson and Nico Leon (Ms. Marvel Vol. 9: Teenage Wasteland), William T. Vollmann (Carbon Ideologies: Volume I, No Immediate Danger, Volume II, No Good Alternative) and Nathan Hare, winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award, among other winners of this year’s award

About San Francisco Public Library

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

San Francisco Public Library Joins Children’s Media Association Bay Area to Present Prix Jeunesse Suitcase

For Immediate Release: October 23, 2019

Michelle Jeffers, San Francisco Public Library
(415) 557-4282 / michelle.jeffers@sfpl.org

San Francisco Public Library Joins Children’s Media Association Bay Area to Present Prix Jeunesse Suitcase

San Francisco, CA – San Francisco Public Library and Children’s Media Association Bay Area are proud to present Prix Jeunesse Suitcase, a montage of children’s programming from around the world, on Thursday, November 14 at the San Francisco Public Main Library. Presenter David Kleeman will share and discuss his suitcase full of curated children’s program selections from the PRIX JEUNESSE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL. Children’s television provides an insightful and unique window into how cultures view childhood, play, learning, and growth. At this showcase, you’ll see innovation and daring, emotion and tension, but also surprise and laughter from David’s favorites.

“The Library is delighted to host this unique screening celebrating childhood and creating connections to our global community.  We welcome filmmakers and connoisseurs young, old and in between to join us for this spectacular visual experience,” said Michelle Jeffers, Chief of Community Programs and Partnership for the San Francisco Public Library.

Elizabeth Rood, President of Children’s Media Association Bay Area, observed: “We are thrilled to be bringing David Kleeman’s beloved ‘Suitcase’ of outstanding children’s shows from around the globe to the Bay Area. And we are so grateful to partner with the San Francisco Public Library. The event is sure to be an invaluable opportunity for intercultural perspective and awareness.”

Date:    Thursday, November 14, 2019

Time:    Program starts 2:30 p.m.

Break 4:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Program ends 7:30 p.m.

Place:   Main Library, 100 Larkin St., Koret Auditorium, Lower Level

Cost:     Free; registration opens 2 p.m.

Prix Jeunesse Suitcase Screening – Thursday, November 14, 2:30 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, Lower Level

About Prix Jeunesse:

The PRIX JEUNESSE Foundation was established in 1964 with the aim to promote quality in children’s television worldwide, by running the bi-annual festival PRIX JEUNESSE INTERNATIONAL and by organizing training for children’s media experts worldwide. The PRIX JEUNESSE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL is the oldest children and youth television festival worldwide. Every two years, it awards the best of the best in children’s television. TV channels and production companies enter their best productions into the competition. The festival week attracts the participation of more than 500 children’s media experts from all over the world.

About David Kleeman:

Strategist, analyst, author, speaker, connector— David Kleeman has led the children’s media industry in developing sustainable, child-friendly practices for more than 35 years. He began this work as president of the American Center for Children and Media and is now Senior Vice President of Global Trends for Dubit, a strategy/research consultancy and digital studio. When he began, “children’s media” meant television. Today, he is fascinated by, and passionate about, kids’ wide range of possibilities for entertainment, engagement, play, and learning. Kleeman uses research, insights, and experience to show that much may change, but children’s developmental path and needs remain constant. Kleeman is the advisory board chair to the international children’s TV festival Prix Jeunesse and on the Board of the 2021 World Summit on Media for Children in Dublin, Ireland. He also serves on Boards for the National Association for Media Literacy Education and the Children’s Media Association. Follow Kleeman on Twitter @davidkleeman.

About San Francisco Public Library:

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

To learn more, please visit sfpl.org and follow on Twitter @SFPublicLibrary and on Instagram @sfpubliclibrary.

About Children’s Media Association Bay Area:

Children’s Media Association Bay Area is a nonprofit organization comprised of professionals who are committed to creating and distributing thoughtful, entertaining media to children and young adults. Children’s Media Association supports this community by producing educational events, promoting professional development, and helping our members to lead, innovate, and shape the future of children’s media. To learn more, please visit childrensmediaassociation.org and follow them on Twitter @CMA_BayArea and on Instagram @cma_bayarea.

San Francisco Public Library Wants to Help You Write the Next Great American Novel

For Immediate Release: October 22, 2019

Michelle Jeffers, San Francisco Public Library
(415) 557-4282 / michelle.jeffers@sfpl.org

San Francisco Public Library Wants to Help You Write the Next Great American Novel

National Novel Writing Month Celebrates its 20th Anniverary of Inspiring Aspiring Writers

San Francisco, CA– November is National Novel Writing Month, also known as NaNoWriMo. In celebration of the program’s 20-year anniversary, San Francisco Public Library brings together acclaimed authors and an array of public workshops to inspire creative writers of all ages to write 50,000 words in just 30 days.

“National Novel Writing Month is the perfect excuse to turn that idea you’ve been carrying around in your head into your masterpiece,” says City Librarian Michael Lambert. “This year’s NaNoWriMo program is exceptional and offers so many entry points to the writing process that are both fun and encouraging. San Francisco Public Library is here to hold your hand and to help you become the great writer you’ve always known you could be!”

In its two decades, NaNoWriMo has created a worldwide community of writers, affectionately known as “Wrimos”. Hosted at several branch libraries, Come Write In events will provide patrons with the space, writing resources, free wifi, computers and laptops, if needed, to start writing and to connect with the greater Wrimo community.

We kick off the month a few days early with an exciting talk featuring bestselling author Alexander Chee. Chee, whose 2016 book, The Queen of the Night was a New York Times Editors’ Choice, will be at the Main Library on Oct. 27 talking about his new memoir, How to Write an Autobiographical Novel.

Need inspiration? Acclaimed authors will offer pro tips on all aspects of the writing process in a series of free author talks. On Nov. 3, editor Kim Bancroft, the author of The Heyday of Malcolm Margolin: The Damn Good Times of a Fiercely Independent Publisher will discuss the writing and revision process followed by The Art of the Literary Portrait with author Constance Hale. Hale assists writers in drawing out important themes with interactive exercises and writing prompts.

For those facing the dreaded writer’s block, author Maury Zeff’s talk, Plot Along with Maury, on Nov.13, will help participants turn plots into stories with well-crafted, satisfying endings. Also on Nov. 13, the Library brings together an all-star NaNoWriMo author panel, including bestselling romance writer Jasmine Guillory, award-winning translator and author Carolina de Robertis and author of Fast-Draft Your Memoir Rachael Herron.

Youth programing includes Kids Write Now!, a month-long writing contest hosted at the Richmond Branch. See full program details below. 

Come Write In

Nov. 3, 10, 17, 24, 1 p.m., Bernal Heights Branch (Teens, Adults)

Nov. 5, 12, 19, 27, 7 p.m., Parkside

Nov. 7, 14, 21, 6 p.m., Main Library, Stong Room

Nov. 7, 14, 21, 1 p.m., Mission Bay Branch

Nov. 21, 6 p.m., Ortega Branch

Nov. 23, 1 p.m., Ocean View Branch at Blue House Café

Author Talks

Alexander CheeThe author of How to Write an Autobiographical Novel talks about his writing process, queer activism during the AIDS crisis in San Francisco and thoughts on growing up mixed race in America.
Oct. 27, 4 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Kim Bancroft author of The Heyday of Malcolm Margolin: The Damn Good Times of a Fiercely Independent Publisher
Nov. 3, 2 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Room

The Art of the Literary Portrait with Constance Hale – Nov. 3, 4 p.m., Main Library, Learning Studio

NaNoWriMo Author Panel featuring Jasmine Guillory, Carolina de Robertis and Rachael Herron – Nov. 13, 6 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Room

Plot Along with Maury Zeff – Nov. 13, 12 p.m., Main Library, Learning Studio

Kids Write Now!– Nov. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 4 p.m., Richmond Branch. Take Part in this month-long writing contest. The more you write, the more you win. Attend a winners’ reception. Reserve at the Children’s Reference Desk. For ages 10–14.

About San Francisco Public Library:

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

To learn more, please visit sfpl.org and follow on Twitter @SFPublicLibrary and on Instagram @sfpubliclibrary.

San Francisco Public Library Joins Children’s Media Association Bay Area to Present Prix Jeunesse Suitcase

For Immediate Release: October 22, 2019

Michelle Jeffers, San Francisco Public Library
(415) 557-4282 / michelle.jeffers@sfpl.org

San Francisco Public Library Joins Children’s Media Association Bay Area to Present Prix Jeunesse Suitcase

San Francisco, CA – San Francisco Public Library and Children’s Media Association Bay Area are proud to present Prix Jeunesse Suitcase, a montage of children’s programming from around the world, on Thursday, November 14 at the San Francisco Public Main Library. Presenter David Kleeman will share and discuss his suitcase full of curated children’s program selections from the PRIX JEUNESSE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL. Children’s television provides an insightful and unique window into how cultures view childhood, play, learning, and growth. At this showcase, you’ll see innovation and daring, emotion and tension, but also surprise and laughter from David’s favorites.

“The Library is delighted to host this unique screening celebrating childhood and creating connections to our global community. We welcome filmmakers and connoisseurs young, old and in between to join us for this spectacular visual experience,” commented Michelle Jeffers, Chief of Community Programs and Partnership for the San Francisco Public Library.

Elizabeth Rood, President of Children’s Media Association Bay Area, observed: “We are thrilled to be bringing David Kleeman’s beloved ‘Suitcase’ of outstanding children’s shows from around the globe to the Bay Area. And we are so grateful to partner with the San Francisco Public Library. The event is sure to be an invaluable opportunity for intercultural perspective and awareness.”

Date:     Thursday, November 14, 2019

Time:    Program starts 2:30 p.m.

Break 4:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Program ends 7:30 p.m.

Place:    Main Library, 100 Larkin St., Koret Auditorium, Lower Level

Cost:      Free; registration opens 2 p.m.

Prix Jeunesse Suitcase Screening – Thursday, November 14, 2:30 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, Lower Level

About Prix Jeunesse:

The PRIX JEUNESSE Foundation was established in 1964 with the aim to promote quality in children’s television worldwide, by running the bi-annual festival PRIX JEUNESSE INTERNATIONAL and by organizing training for children’s media experts worldwide. The PRIX JEUNESSE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL is the oldest children and youth television festival worldwide. Every two years, it awards the best of the best in children’s television. TV channels and production companies enter their best productions into the competition. The festival week attracts the participation of more than 500 children’s media experts from all over the world.

About David Kleeman:

Strategist, analyst, author, speaker, connector — David Kleeman has led the children’s media industry in developing sustainable,child-friendly practices for more than 35 years. He began this work as president of the American Center for Children and Media and is now Senior Vice President of Global Trends for Dubit, a strategy/research consultancy and digital studio. When he began, “children’s media” meant television. Today, he is fascinated by, and passionate about, kids’ wide range of possibilities for entertainment, engagement, play, and learning. Kleeman uses research, insights, and experience to show that much may change, but children’s developmental path and needs remain constant. Kleeman is the advisory board chair to the international children’s TV festival Prix Jeunesse and on the Board of the 2021 World Summit on Media for Children in Dublin, Ireland. He also serves on Boards for the National Association for Media Literacy Education and the Children’s Media Association. Follow Kleeman on Twitter @davidkleeman.

About San Francisco Public Library:

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

To learn more, please visit sfpl.org and follow on Twitter @SFPublicLibrary and on Instagram @sfpubliclibrary.

About Children’s Media Association Bay Area:

Children’s Media Association Bay Area is a nonprofit organization comprised of professionals who are committed to creating and distributing thoughtful, entertaining media to children and young adults. Children’s Media Association supports this community by producing educational events, promoting professional development, and helping our members to lead, innovate, and shape the future of children’s media. To learn more,please visit childrensmediaassociation.org and follow them on Twitter @CMA_BayArea and on Instagram@cma_bayarea.

2019 San Francisco Veterans Film Festival – Sharing compelling stories of strength and discovery

For Immediate Release: October 16, 2019

Media Contacts:

Eddie Ramirez, San Francisco Veterans Film Fest
(415) 244-7100 / Eduardo.Ramirez415@gmail.com

Jaime Wong, San Francisco Public Library
(415) 554-4295 / Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

2019 San Francisco Veterans Film Festival

Sharing compelling stories of strength and discovery

San Francisco, CA– OneVet OneVoice and San Francisco Public Library announce the lineup for the 8th Annual San Francisco Veterans Film Festival (#SFVFF19), the Bay Area’s premier military and veteran film event. The festival, with screenings on Nov. 2 and 3 at the Main Library, provides a unique forum for veterans to find expression, healing, and community while increasing the public’s awareness of the multitude of challenges facing our nation’s military veterans.

The powerful independent films featured in this year’s festival explore complex topics, including the over-prescription of medications, female veterans coping with trauma and PTSD, Native American and Chinese American experiences in the service and back home, investigations into profiteering and corruption and the complicated situation for Iraqi and Afghan citizens who serve as U.S. military interpreters.

The two-day festival includes 13 films, both short and full-length, as well as panel discussions with film directors and cast. The program is free to the public, and everyone is welcome to attend all or part of the two-day event. Saturday festival attendees are also invited to the evening’s Filmmakers Reception.

“We are honored to once again provide a forum for veterans to express their creativity, tell their stories, and connect with other veterans, active duty personnel and our civilian family. This festival is only two days a year, but the subjects we explore affect our veterans each day of their lives. We hope these films and panel discussions bring honor, promote healing and build stronger bonds among all Americans,” comments Eddie Ramirez, founder of the San Francisco Veterans Film Festival and the sponsoring organization OneVet OneVoice.

Highlights of the 2019 San Francisco Veterans Film Festival include the following:

Vigil, written and directed by Chris King

A young woman lies awake, thinking about what could have been. “Vigil” is a short, powerful tribute to our fallen soldiers and their families. Inspired by a true story.

Screening Saturday, Nov. 2

Our Youngest Heroes: Growing Up a Caregiver, directed by Richard Lui

This first-person documentary is presented through the lens of a national news anchor, who comes from a military background and cares for his father long-distance. He embarks on a personal journey to shed light on the untold stories of these young caregivers confronting the same questions he does: How much can I sacrifice? And will I regret my choices? Will I let my loved one down?

Screening Saturday, Nov. 2, followed by panel discussion with filmmakers and cast

Unprescribed, directed by Steve Ellmore

Amid the opioid and suicide epidemics, military veterans across the nation are ditching prescription medications in favor of cannabis. In his first feature-length documentary, producer, director, and military veteran Steve Ellmore chronicles the lives of fellow veterans, spouses, and family members coping with war-related trauma and the loss of loved ones to suicide brought on by the over-prescription of pharmaceuticals.

Screening Sunday, Nov. 3

Vietnam: An Inner View,directed and produced by Marc C. Waszkiewicz; written, narrated and produced by Lea Jones

Vietnam: An Inner View is a music-based documentary providing an apolitical, uniquely accessible,compassionate look at a small group of young Marines as they serve their tours of duty in Vietnam circa 1968. The film is built around an all-original ‘60s rock soundtrack and populated by the thousands of photographs made by director/producer Marc C. Waszkiewicz during his three combat tours. Additionally, PBS-produced interviews with Marc’s brothers-in-arms, made primarily in 1995, offer an array of insights into common experiences, some of course harrowing and heartbreaking, some of general (military/personal) interest, and others simply hilarious.

Screening Sunday, Nov. 3, followed by directors’ panel

The full lineup of screenings is available at sfveteransfilmfestival.org. RSVP: https://bit.ly/2VvSmjo

San Francisco Veterans Film Festival – Nov. 2, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Nov. 3, 12 – 5 p.m., San Francisco Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St.

About the San Francisco Veterans Film Festival

San Francisco Veterans Film Festival is a robust forum for Veterans and civilian filmmakers to express their creativity and to share their stories, which in turn helps further healing and brings greater awareness to the public on the challenges our nation’s veteran’s face. The annual festival spotlights both veteran and civilian filmmakers addressing issues about Veterans and military-related topics.  For more information, visit sfveteransfilmfestival.org.

About OneVet OneVoice

OneVet OneVoice is a non-profit based in San Francisco founded on the belief that healthcare, education, housing and employees for veterans and military families should be inextricably linked together. The goal of the San Francisco Veterans Film Festival is to support one of the key missions of OneVet OneVoice: to educate the general public about the current issues facing our veterans, and provide a place for veterans to learn more about current support available.

About the San Francisco Public Library’s Veterans Resource Center

San Francisco Public Library’s Veterans Resource Center, located on the 5th floor of the Main Library, supports the veteran community with free computer access, a specialized veterans book collection, and information and assistance for veterans and their families. For more information, please visit sfpl.org/veterans.

Diverse Writers Share Their Stories

For Immediate Release: October 10, 2019
Media contact: Jaime Wong
(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

Diverse Writers Share Their Stories

San Francisco, CA – The San Francisco Public Library is hosting a celebration of women of color authors, who will be reading from and talking about their writing, as well as how their various backgrounds influence their creative works.

Award-winning Pakistani writer and artist, Sehba Sarwar, will read from her recently-published debut novel Black Wings. This book is about a story of a mother and daughter who struggle to meet across the generations, cultures and secrets that separate them. Bay Area-based writer Fan Wu will read from her critically acclaimed novels, including Beautiful as Yesterday, a book about two sisters who were born and brought up in China and now reside in the United States. Her writing explores the impact of history and memories on one’s life. Lastly, fourth-generation Southern Californian liz gonzález will share from her multi-genre collection Dancing in the Santa Ana Winds. Her book explores memories, pivotal experiences and cultural influences that shaped her when growing up as a nontraditional Catholic Mexican American in San Bernardino.

Date:   Thursday, October 17, 2019

Time:   5:30 p.m.

Place:  Main Library, 100 Larkin St., Chinese Center, 3rd Floor

Cost:   Free

Attention Calendar Editors: General event information

Author Reading with Sehba Sarwar, Fan Wu, and liz gonzález takes place on Thursday, October 17, 5:30 p.m., Chinese Center, 3rd Floor, Main Library, 100 Larkin Street, San Francisco. Participants include Sehba Sarwar, award-winning Pakistani writer and artist; Fan Wu, critically-acclaimed Bay Area novelist; and liz gonzález, poet, fiction and nonfiction writer and educator. Admission free. Wheelchair accessible. For more information, contact Anissa Malady, Community Programs and Partnerships,San Francisco Public Library, 415-557-4411.

Author Reading: Sehba Sarwar, Fan Wu, and liz gonzález – Thursday, October 17, 5:30 p.m., Main Library, Chinese Center, 3rd Floor

Christian Robinson Takes Flight in New Book

For Immediate Release: 10/8/19
Media Contacts:

Lyn Davidson, Main Library, Fisher Children’s Center
(415) 557-4552; Carole.Davidson@sfpl.org

Jaime Wong, Public Relations Officer
(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

Christian Robinson Takes Flight in New Book

Award-winning illustrator shares work and play at the Library

SAN FRANCISCO, CA Award-winning illustrator Christian Robinson introduces his new picture book, Just in Case You Want to Fly—a special book for everyone who has ever needed wings—in a just-announced event at the San Francisco Public Library Main Children’s Center on Wednesday, Oct. 16, at 5p.m.

Robinson will discuss his work and lead a mini-drawing workshop for an all-ages audience. Copies of Just In Case You Want to Fly will be available for purchase, and a book-signing will conclude the event. Youth ages 18 and younger can enter the raffle drawing for free copies of the book.

Caldecott Honor Award and Coretta Scott King Honor Award-winning illustrator Christian Robinson’s second collaboration with author Julie Fogliano is the tender, vibrant, and inspiring picture book Just In Case You Want to Fly (Holiday House, October 8, 2019). Written for children and their grown-ups, it offers gentle wisdom for anyone looking for a little uplift to help them soar. It is a tender and inspiring story about growing up, facing challenges, and finding your wings…together.

“Just in case you want to fly

here’s some wind

and here’s the sky

here’s a feather

here’s up high

and here’s a wing from a butterfly.”

Fogliano and Robinson’s previous book, When’s My Birthday?, received five starred reviews and was called “buoyant and perfectly childlike” by School Library Journal and “nostalgic and fresh” by Kirkus Reviews. It was also named a 2018 Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Book.

Featured Event
Just In Case You Want to Fly…with Christian Robinson – Oct. 16, 5p.m., Main Library, Fisher Children’s Center

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 415-557-4554. Register on Eventbrite at https://christianrobinsonsfpl2019.eventbrite.com.

There There Author Tommy Orange Comes to San Francisco Public Library

For Immediate Release: 10/7/19
Media Contact:
Jaime Wong
(415) 557-4295 | Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

There There Author Tommy Orange Comes to San Francisco Public Library

Award-winning debut author in conversation with City’s Poet Laureate Kim Shuck

San Francisco, CA — As part of its 15th Annual One City One Book celebration of There There, the San Francisco Public Library is proud to host author Tommy Orange for a discussion of his work on the evening of October 16, 2019. Orange is a recent graduate from the MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts. He is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma, and was born, raised and currently resides in Oakland, CA. On Oct. 16, Orange will be in conversation with San Francisco Poet Laureate Kim Shuck. A book signing will follow the event.

The selection of There There as this year’s One City One Book title is a key part of a citywide initiative to shine a spotlight on Indigenous Peoples in the Bay Area this fall.

There There, Orange’s debut novel, tells the story of urban Native Americans living in Oakland, CA, depicting a beautiful and urgently real landscape of the Native experience in the Bay Area past and present day. This compelling read grapples with complex and painful histories through a constellation of twelve characters from Native communities. As the characters each make their individual journeys to the Big Oakland Powwow, they discover truths about themselves, and eventually each other, long buried but ready to be brought into the light.

Since the publication of the hardcover by Knopf in June 2018, There There has been a national bestseller, received four starred reviews, and was named as Best Book of the Year by the San Francisco Chronicle, New York Times, Washington Post, NPR, and Time Magazine. Additionally, the novel received the PEN/Hemingway Award, the American Book Award and was a finalist for the 2018 Pulitzer Prize in fiction.

This year’s One City One Book program is a joint partnership with the San Francisco Arts Commission, Oakland Public Library,City College of San Francisco and June Jordan School of Equity. 

Featured Event
Tommy Orange in Conversation

Oct. 16, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Nov. 1, 6:30 p.m., Oakland Museum of California – James Moore Theater, 1000 Oak St., Oakland (in partnership with Oakland Public Library)

There There Book Groups

•Saturday, Oct. 12, 10:30 a.m.–12 p.m., Main Library, Talking Books and Braille Center

• Saturday, Oct. 12, 2–3 p.m., Richmond Branch

• Sunday, Oct. 13, 2–3 p.m., Bernal Heights Branch

• Tuesday, Oct. 22, 6–7 p.m., North Beach Branch

• Tuesday, Oct. 22, 7–8 p.m., Excelsior Branch

• Sunday, Nov. 3, 3:30–4:30 p.m., Eureka Valley Branch

• Tuesday, Nov. 5, 6:30–7:30 p.m., Mission Branch

• Wednesday, Nov. 6, 6–7 p.m., Glen Park Branch

• Sunday, Nov. 10, 2–3 p.m., Parkside Branch

• Wednesday, Nov. 13, 6–7 p.m., Main Library

• Saturday, Nov. 16, 2–3:30 p.m., Ingleside Branch

• Saturday, Nov. 23, 2–3 p.m., Visitacion Valley Branch

• Tuesday, Dec. 3, 7–8:30 p.m., Merced Branch

For more programs relating to One City One Book, see sfpl.org/onecityonebook.

Editorial Reviews + Awards

  • PEN/Hemingway Award winner, 2019
  • American Book Award winner, 2019
  • The Center for Fiction First Novel Prize winner, 2019
  • National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize winner, 2018
  • Pulitzer Prize(Fiction) finalist, 2019
  • Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction finalist, 2019
  • Art Seidenbaum Award finalist, 2019
  • Aspen Words Literary Prize finalist, 2019
  • Best Book of the Year, New York Times, Washington Post, NPR, Time, O, San Francisco Chronicle, Boston Globe

“An exquisite mix of unflinching anger and sadness and humor.”

The San Francisco Chronicle

“Powerful. . . . There There has so much jangling energy and brings so much news from a distinct corner of American life that it’s a revelation.”

The New York Times

“A rush of intensity and fervor… Bursting with talent and big ideas… Funny and profane and conscious of the violence that runs like a scar through American culture.”
The Seattle Times

“Masterful. White-hot. A devastating debut novel.”
The Washington Post

“With a literary authority rare in a debut novel, it places Native American voices front and center before readers’ eyes.” —NPR/Fresh Air

“A symphonic debut…Engrossing… There There introduces an exciting voice.”
Booklist (starred review) “Commanding…The propulsion of both the overall narrative and its players are breathtaking as Orange unpacks how decisions of the past mold the present,resulting in a haunting and gripping story.”
Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Visceral… A chronicle of domestic violence, alcoholism, addiction, and pain,the book reveals the perseverance and spirit of the characters… Unflinching candor… Highly recommended.”
Library Journal (starred review)

“Kaleidoscopic… In this vivid and moving book, Orange articulates the challenges and complexities not only of Native Americans, but also of America itself.”
Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

About One City One Book

One City One Book: San Francisco Reads is an annual citywide literary event that encourages members of the San Francisco community to read the same book at the same time and then discuss it in book groups and at events throughout the City. By building bridges between communities and generations through the reading and most importantly the discussion of – one book, we hope to help to make reading a lifelong pursuit and to build a more literate society. Sponsors for One City One Book include the San Francisco Public Library and Friends of the San Francisco Public Library. The program is also supported by many bookstore partners, program partners and media sponsors.