San Francisco Public Library Is Fabulously Fine Free


For Immediate Release: September 16, 2019
Media Contact:
Jaime Wong

(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT

San Francisco Public Library Is Fabulously Fine Free

Effective today, September 16, 2019, San Francisco Public Library has eliminated overdue fines for all Library patrons. Additionally, the Library is clearing all outstanding overdue fines from all patron records.

The San Francisco Public Library was a pioneer in the fine free library movement. SFPL eliminated fines for children and teens in 1974. In recent years, inspired by other library systems that had eliminated fines for overdue materials for patrons of all ages, the Library partnered with the San Francisco Financial Justice Project of the Treasurer’s Office to study whether SFPL should go fine free. The full report on the findings of this study can be found here.

The study found that the elimination of overdue fines in libraries had several positive outcomes:

  • Increased patron access to materials and services
  • Reduction of the inequitable impact of overdue fines
  • Improved patron relationships with their library
  • Optimization of library staff time and increased staff efficiency

After reviewing the findings from the study developed by Library staff and the team at the Financial Justice Project, the San Francisco Public Library Commission voted to approve a resolution urging the City’s Board of Supervisors to amend the Library’s fines and fees schedule, eliminating all overdue fines.

Additionally, the Library Commission voted to approve a resolution urging the Board of Supervisors to pass an ordinance to forgive all outstanding overdue fines owed to the Library and authorize the San Francisco Public Library to clear all outstanding overdue fines from patron accounts.

The two resolutions went before the Board of Supervisors and the Mayor for adoption through the City’s Fiscal Year 2019-2020 budget process. The City budget was signed by Mayor London Breed in August, paving the way for the Library to take final steps in the process of eliminating fines,clearing outstanding fines from patron records, and restoring accounts that had been suspended because they had reached the maximum limit on overdue fines.

While the Library eliminated overdue fines, library users are still responsible for fees associated with the replacement of lost or damaged books and other materials they check out. Under this new policy, it is important to understand the difference between overdue fines and billed-item fees. Overdue fines are the daily charges applied to items not returned by their specified due date. These are the fines that will no longer be charged to patrons. Billed-item fees, or just fees, represent the charges applied for lost,damaged, or unreturned materials and are still in effect.

San Francisco Public Library is part of a nation-wide movement to reduce access barriers and live up to its commitment to free and equal access to its communities. This map from the Urban Libraries Council shows other fine free libraries.

For more information, visit sfpl.org/finefree.

About San Francisco Public Library

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information,knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

¡VIVA! Celebrating Latino Hispanic Heritage – Concerts, Dance, Crafts, Food & Films at the San Francisco Public Library

For Immediate Release: 9/3/19
Media Contacts: Jaime Wong
(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

& Michelle Jeffers
(415) 557-4282; michelle.jeffers@sfpl.org

¡VIVA! Celebrating Latino Hispanic Heritage

Concerts, Dance, Crafts, Food & Films at the San Francisco Public Library

San Francisco,CA – Bienvenidos! In celebration of Latino Hispanic Heritage Month, San Francisco Public Library isproud to announce ¡VIVA!, a citywide celebration of Latino Hispanic cultures with more than 100 music, food, film, dance, crafts and author talks happening mid-September through the end of October.

Adults can step into Cuban and Brazilian dance; enjoy classical Latin music; engage in a discussion with Queer and Trans Latinx writers, activists and leaders; attend a Latinx literary variety show; explore San Francisco History Center’s Carnaval archive; hear live oral histories from the women entrepreneurs of La Cocina’s cookbook and so much more! 

The Library is thrilled to partner with the Mexican Museum: bringing Tecuan masks from their permanent collections, they will educate and lead a unique craft program to construct 2D/3D masks. Local children’s book authors Aida Salazar (The Moon Within) and Mitali Perkins (Between Us and Abuela) showcase their latest titles at read alouds. Feel the beat of music with the Latin Jazz Youth Ensemble. Finally, head to the Main Children’s Center for a presentation from Taller Bombalele on Bomba, a tradition of songs, rhythm and dance steeped in a Taino-African alliance in resistance to colonization and slavery in Puerto Rico.

All library locations throughout the city will be full of papel picado (paper streamers), flores de papel (paper flowers) and ofrendas (altars), ready to host events and classes celebrating Latino Hispanic heritage, cultures and traditions. This year’s ¡VIVA! events embrace all ages and all people. 

Visit sfpl.org/VIVA for more details and to view the ¡VIVA! Program Guide. ¡VIVA! is funded in part by Friends of the San Francisco Public Library. All programs at the Library are free.

¡VIVA! Programs
For a complete list of activities and events, view the program guide.

Special Performances and Highlights

Misión Flamenca Dance Troupe
– Sept. 14, 3 p.m., Main Library, Atrium 

The Moon Within with Children’s Author Aida Salazar – Sept.14, 1 p.m., West Portal Branch

Still Here San Francisco: Queer and Trans Latinx Writers in This CitySept. 14, 2:30 p.m., Mission Branch

Mission Grafica: Off the Wall – Sept. 20, 6:30 p.m., Mission Cultural Center, 2868 Mission St.

Between Us and Abuela with Children’s Author Mitali Perkins – Oct. 12, 2 p.m., Bernal Heights Branch

Queer Latinx History of the Mission’s 16th Street Corridor – Sept. 25, 6 p.m., Eureka Valley Branch 

Hands on History: Carnaval in the Archives – Oct. 1, 6:30 p.m., Main Library, San Francisco History Center, 6th Floor

Literary Events

Book Launch: Maestrapeace: San Francisco’s Monumental Feminist Mural Sept. 14, 1 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Solito, Solita: Crossing Borders with Youth Refugees from Central America – Oct. 8, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium 

Carolina de Robertis – Cantoras – Oct. 9, 6 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Room 

Arts & Crafts Programs

Mask Making with The Mexican MuseumSept. 19, 4 p.m., Marina Branch; Oct. 5, 2 p.m.,Visitacion Valley Branch; Oct. 24, 3:30 p.m., Mission Branch; Oct. 30, 4 p.m. Noe Valley Branch

Zapotec Rugs CraftSept. 20, 4 p.m., Merced Branch

Milagros and Rain Sticks with the Museum of Craft and DesignOct. 12, 2 p.m., Visitacion Valley Branch

Día de los Muertos Skeleton CraftOct. 30, 3:30 p.m., Chinatown Branch

Food Programs

Guacamole Party – Sept. 22, 3 pm., Portola Branch

We Are La Cocina: Recipes in Pursuit of the American Dream – Oct. 15, 6 p.m, Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Room 

Music & Dance Performances

¿Donde Esta Mi Gente? Latinx Literary Variety Show (¡Viva! edition!) – Sept. 18, 6 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Room

Taller Bombalele – Sept. 28, 2 p.m., Main Library, Children’s General Floor Area

Latin Jazz Youth Ensemble of San Francisco – Oct. 26, 3 p.m., Western Addition Branch

Día de Los Muertos Altar Workshops + Programs


Día de los Muertos Altar Workshop

Oct. 27, 2 p.m., Park Branch

Oct. 30, 6 p.m., Excelsior

Oct. 31, 3 p.m., Sunset Branch

Día de los Muertos Altar Workshop – Teens only

Fri. Nov. 1, 4 p.m., Main Library, The Mix

Sat. Nov. 2, 4 p.m., Main Library, The Mix

Día de los Muertos Community Altar

Oct. 25 – Nov. 4, Visitacion Valley Branch

Oct. 26 – Nov. 2, Bernal Heights Branch

Films

La GuajiraOct. 1, 6:30 p.m., Noe Valley Branch

Dolores: Rebel. Activist. Feminist. Mother.– Oct. 5, 3 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Una Noche Sin Luna/A Moonless NightOct. 13, 2 p.m., Anza Branch

Peek Into Rock‘n’Roll Past with Backstage Pass

For Immediate Release: 8/28/19
Media Contact: Jaime Wong
(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

Peek Into Rock‘n’Roll Past with Backstage Pass
New Library Exhibit Features Landmark Rolling Stone Covers, Contact Sheets

SAN FRANCISCO, CAImmortalized by writers, filmmakers and artists, the cover of Rolling Stone magazine is iconic. The exhibition Backstage Pass: Baron Wolman and the Early Years of Rolling Stone explores how the lens of one artist’s camera captured and helped define one of the most important eras in rock’n’roll history. The exhibition will be at the Main Library, Jewett Gallery, August 31 – October 20, 2019.

Through the exhibition’s 35 framed photographs, contact sheets and original Rolling Stone magazine covers, Backstage Pass presents an intimate view of a crucial period of cultural transformation in American history. Visitors go “backstage” to see how photographic coverage of events, such as Woodstock and the Day on the Green, have contributed to our collective cultural memory. Experience through the exhibit how featured artists Jimi Hendrix, Mick Jagger, Janis Joplin, Tina Turner and Frank Zappa came to represent generational ideals through music, words and visual imagery.

Backstage Pass is curated by Ben Ahlvers, gallery director at the Lawrence Arts Center in Lawrence, Kansas. The exhibition is toured by ExhibitsUSA, a national program of Mid-America Arts Alliance (M-AAA).

This exhibit will be on view in the Jewett Gallery on the Lower Level of the San Francisco Public Library between August 31 and October 20, 2019.

Exhibit: Backstage Pass Aug. 31 – Oct. 20, Main Library, Jewett Gallery, Lower Level

Related Programs

Ben Fong TorresHistorian Ben Fong Torres was editor and writer for Rolling Stone almost 50 years ago. Join us as he discusses the San Francisco music scene – and Rolling Stone Magazine.  He’s got stories! Sept. 8, 1p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium


San Francisco Rock Photography in the Psychedelic Era – Rock music author and historian Richie Unterberger presents on San Francisco rock music photography in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Showcasing classic rock photos taken by several notable photographers of the era. Sept. 11, 6 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Room

About San Francisco Public Library 

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

Former Japanese American Incarcerees Talk About Their Lives Behind Barbed Wire at Special Program Featuring Screening of Documentary, Moving Walls

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 22, 2019

Press contact: Sharon Yamato, (310) 922-6525

Former Japanese American Incarcerees Talk About Their Lives Behind Barbed Wire at Special Program Featuring Screening of Documentary, Moving Walls

Former WWII Japanese American detainees Hiroshi Kashiwagi and Yae Wada, both in their 90s will join filmmaker Sharon Yamato and photojournalist Stan Honda in a special presentation at San Francisco Public Library’s Koret Auditorium that focuses on the WWII camp experience, Saturday, Sept. 7, at 2 pm. Civil rights activist and attorney Don Tamaki will serve as moderator.

Kashiwagi is an award-winning poet, actor, memoirist, and playwright who was a librarian at San Francisco Public Library for 25 years. He was incarcerated as a teenager at the Tule Lake Segregation Center, a camp designated for those who refused to answer affirmatively to the so-called “loyalty questionnaire” that was instituted by the U.S. government. Branded disloyal, he spent years fighting for his citizenship back after renouncing it during the war. Also serving on the panel is Yae (Katanayagi) Wada, a 99-year-old retiree currently residing in Berkeley, who recently spoke for the first time publicly about suffering a miscarriage during the war while temporarily housed in a horse stall at the Tanforan Assembly Center in San Bruno.

The program will begin with a screening of Yamato’s film, Moving Walls, a documentary short that focuses on what happened at one of the Japanese American incarceration sites after the war when hundreds of barracks were sold for a dollar apiece to veterans-turned-homesteaders. Both film and an accompanying book chronicle the history of these barracks as they went from the Heart Mountain concentration camp to the Wyoming homestead. Because the buildings at this camp were distributed widely after the war, they can be seen today throughout the Park County area surrounding the camp. One of the buildings that survived is now permanently exhibited at the Japanese American National Museum and represents the largest and most important visual artifact from the confinement period. Yamato recorded the histories of those who lived in the barracks during the war and followed the aftermath of the hastily constructed buildings built to imprison more than 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry.

Award-winning New York photographer Stan Honda is renowned for his coverage of September 11, and two of his photos are featured in the 9/11 Memorial and Museum in New York City. Currently known for his night sky photography, he remains committed to furthering the incarceration story partially based on his own family’s experience of being held at a camp in Poston, Arizona. His photos are featured in the film’s accompanying book, Moving Walls: The Barracks of America’s Concentration Camps, and are currently on display at the Military Intelligence Service Historic Learning Center at the Presidio in an exhibition sponsored by SF’s National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS) through Sept.30.

Both Yamato and Honda will also be conducting a gallery talk at the MIS Learning Center at 640 North Mason Street at the Presidio on the morning preceding the program, Sept.7, at 11 a.m.

This project was funded by the Department of Interior, National Park Service (NPS) through the Japanese American Confinement Sites (JACS) grant program for the year 2014-2015, it was published under the fiscal sponsorship of Visual Communications, Inc. Additional funds for the screening and panel discussion were provided by the California State Library’s California Civil Liberties Public Education Program.

For more information on this program, contact Sharon Yamato at sharony360@gmail.com.

Moving Walls – September 7, 2 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St.

City Librarian Appoints Maureen Singleton as San Francisco Public Library Chief Operating Officer

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Monday, August 19, 2019

Contact: SFPL Public Affairs (415) 557-4277

*** PRESS RELEASE ***

CITY LIBRARIAN APPOINTS MAUREEN SINGLETON AS

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

Singleton has served as Acting COO since March 2018

Photo credit: Sonia Rivas of FotosRivas

San Francisco, CA – San Francisco City Librarian Michael Lambert today appointed Maureen Singleton to serve as San Francisco Public Library’s Chief Operating Officer (COO). Singleton, formerly the Library’s Chief Financial Officer, has served as Acting COO since March 2018.

During her tenure, San Francisco Public Library has witnessed an unprecedented period of success and sustained excellence, from the completion of the Branch Library Improvement Program (BLIP), achieving National Library of the Year honors in 2018 and most recently with the Library achieving the highest overall grade (A-) ever bestowed upon any department of city government in San Francisco. Singleton also provided the financial case to the Board of Supervisors to enable the Library to eliminate overdue fines.

“I am thrilled to be promoting Maureen Singleton to serve as the Library’s first ever Chief Operating Officer,” said Lambert. “Maureen is mission driven, a careful steward of the community’s resources and passionate about the myriad opportunities to positively impact the lives of city residents through library services.”

Singleton is a 17-year veteran of the City and County of San Francisco, getting her first experience with city government career as a budget analyst for the Board of Supervisors’ Budget Analysts Office. She also worked for the city’s Department of Public Health, the Public Library and the Public Works Department. She was appointed Chief Financial Officer at San Francisco Public Library in 2011.

“I am honored and excited to serve as the Library’s Chief Operating Officer and to be able to work alongside staff who are dedicated to making a difference. I firmly believe that libraries are centers of our communities, providing access to information, creating opportunities, and serving as a rising tide to lift up our society,” said Singleton.

A native San Franciscan, Singleton began her career in public service as a case worker in Senator Dianne Feinstein’s office. She holds a Master of Public Administration from the University of Washington, Evans School of Public Policy and Governance and a Bachelor of Science in Economics from the California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. She lives with her husband and daughter in the East Bay.

About San Francisco Public Library

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches,the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

The 2019 Effie Lee Morris Lecture Series Celebrates Women Writers

For Immediate Release: 8/19/19
Media Contact: Lyn Davidson, Main Library, Fisher Children’s Center
(415) 557-4552; Carole.Davidson@sfpl.org

The 2019 Effie Lee Morris Lecture Series Celebrates Women Writers

Acclaimed authors to share powerful stories in September and October

SAN FRANCISCO, CA Join the San Francisco Public Library Main Children’s Center this fall as we present the 23rd and 24th Effie Lee Morris Lectures. The lectures will celebrate the voices of two gifted female authors, Renée Watson on Thursday, September 5, and F. Isabel Campoy on Wednesday, October 2.

Renée Watson is the Coretta Scott King Award-winning author of the young adult novel Piecing Me Together (Bloomsbury, 2017). The novel, a powerful story about an ambitious teenager carving out her place in the world, was named a John Newbery Honor Book in 2018. Watson’s newest work, a middle grade novel titled Some Places More Than Others, will be published on September 3 by Bloomsbury Children’s Books. Watson will deliver the 23rd Effie Lee Morris Lecture on September 5.

F. Isabel Campoy is the author of numerous children’s books in the areas of poetry, theatre, biographies and art, and the recipient of the International Latino Children’s Book Award. Her picture book Maybe Something Beautiful (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016) was inspired by the Urban Art Trail project in San Diego. Campoy will deliver the 24th Effie Lee Morris Lecture on October 2.

The Effie Lee Morris Lectures honor the work of the late Effie Lee Morris by celebrating the work of writers and illustrators for children whose work exemplifies the causes she championed: inclusivity, diversity and the rights of all children to read, learn and create. Ms. Morris was the first coordinator of children’s services at the San Francisco Public Library, the first African American president of the Public Library Association and a founder of the local chapter of the Women’s National Book Association (WNBA). Historically an annual event, 2019 marks the first year that the Library will host two Effie Lee Morris Lectures.

Sponsored by the Main Library’s Fisher Children’s Center, Friends of the San Francisco Public Library and the San Francisco chapter of the Women’s National Book Association, the author talks are free and open to all ages. A book signing will follow each lecture. Registration is suggested as space is limited.

23rd Annual Effie Lee Morris Lecture with Renée Watson, “The Miracle of Joy: How Stories Heal” – September 5, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St.

Registration link: https://sfpl-effie-lee-morris23.eventbrite.com

24th Annual Effie Lee Morris Lecture with Isabel Campoy, “Mi Voz Latina for a Choir of Diversity In Children’s Literature”  – October 2, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St.

Registration link: https://sfpl-effie-lee-morris24.eventbrite.com

Hit a Home Run with New SF Giants Library Card

For Immediate Release: 8/16/19

Media Contact: Jaime Wong
(415) 214-2279; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT

Invitation to Cover / Photo Opportunity


Hit a Home Run with New SF Giants Library Card

New Giants library cards promote the excitement of reading and visiting the library over baseball season and beyond.

WHAT: Hometown heroes the San Francisco Giants is partnering up with San Francisco Public Library to launch a brand-new library card design that captures the childhood charm and love of America’s favorite pastime. Designed by the SF Giants, this library card boasts the distinctive, bold orange and black team colors, and features a festive print of bats, balls, players, mitts, diamonds and the widely-recognizable Giants logo. The SF Giants card, like all San Francisco Public Library cards, opens up a world of possibilities.

This unique design will launch during the Junior Giants Day celebration at the Oracle Park, available to all public at Seals Plaza. It will be then be available at the Main Library and all branches on Monday, 8/19.

WHEN: 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sunday, August 18, 2019

WHERE: Seals Plaza at Marina Gate, Oracle Park

WHO:

  • Children, families, books and baseball fans of all ages
  • San Francisco Public Library Bookmobile and outreach team

About San Francisco Public Library

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

Read to Achieve with the Golden State Warriors: Special Storytime

For Immediate Release: July 29, 2019
Media Contact:
Jaime Wong

(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT

Invitation to Cover / Photo Opportunity

Read to Achieve with the Golden State Warriors: Special Storytime  

WHAT: The Golden State Warriors take over the library’s school-age storytime program with a very special guest to celebrate the Library’s summer reading and exploration program, Summer Stride. Former Player and Warriors Community Ambassador Adonal Foyle will be on hand to encourage reading and learning all summer long. More details about the event here.

WHEN: 2 p.m., Wednesday, July 31, 2019

WHERE: Main Library, Fisher Children’s Center, 2nd floor

WHO:

  • Former Player and Warriors Community Ambassador Adonal Foyle
  • Children from neighborhood schools and camps

MORE SUMMER FUN:

The Warriors storytime is part of Summer Stride 2019, the Library’s award-winning summer learning program, with more than 1,000 fun, informative and timely programs supporting science, technology, education, math and reading for all ages at every branch, every week of the summer June 1 – August 18.

Tracking summer reading is encouraged, with finishers earning a coveted prize designed by award-winning children’s book illustrator Zachariah OHora. The art for this year’s program was inspired by Chronicle Books’s Bikes for Sale, written by Carter Higgins. The bold and bright campaign artwork reflects libraries as an essential resource and gathering space for children, teens and adults to share and learn. All are welcome at the San Francisco Public Library.

The Library also offers summer weekly raffles. Prizes include free passes to local museums, concert tickets, local restaurant gift certificates and more. Patrons can enter the weekly raffles at any branch library.

San Francisco Public Library Announces 2019 One City One Book

For Immediate Release: 7/26/19

Media Contact: Jaime Wong
(415) 557-4295 | Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

San Francisco Public Library Announces 2019 One City One Book

There There  
By Tommy Orange

San Francisco, CA — San Francisco Public Library is excited to announce that ThereThere, by Tommy Orange, has been selected as the 15th Annual One City One Book. The selection of There There—a novel that the New York Times calls a “revelation”—as this year’s One City One Book title is a key part of a citywide initiative to shine a spotlight on Indigenous Peoples in the Bay Area this fall.

There There tells the story of urban Native Americans living in Oakland, CA, depicting a beautiful and urgently real landscape of the Native experience in the Bay Area past and present day. This compelling read grapples with complex and painful histories through a constellation of twelve characters from Native communities. As the characters each make their individual journeys to the Big Oakland Powwow, they discover truths about themselves, and eventually each other, long buried but ready to be brought into the light.

“We are proud to select There There as this year’s must-read for San Francisco’s One City One Book program. The goal of this citywide literary event is to build bridges between communities and generations through reading and discussing a single book, and to encourage reading as both a lifelong pursuit and an essential act of empathy. The powerful depiction of these characters’ experiences—rendered with stunning impact by Orange’s sheer writing virtuosity—has kept me turning the book over in my mind since reading it. I encourage all to join in this conversation,” said City Librarian Michael Lambert.

Since the publication of the hardcover by Knopf in June 2018, There There has been a national bestseller, received four starred reviews, and was named as Best Book of the Year by the New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Washington Post, NPR, and Time Magazine. Additionally, the novel received the PEN/Hemingway Award and was a finalist for the 2018 Pulitzer Prize in fiction.

Read There There and join the Library for its exciting 15th Annual One City One Book programs. Copies of the book will be featured in all San Francisco libraries and at bookstores around the city. Throughout the months of October and November 2019, There There will be widely available at all San Francisco libraries and at bookstores around the city.

The Library is thrilled to offer many events and programs related to One City One Book. Among the many offerings, Tommy Orange will be discussing his work with San Francisco Poet Laureate Kim Shuck on October 16 at the Koret Auditorium at the Main Library. Additionally, the Library will be hosting book talks, themed exhibits and a city-wide celebration of American Indian heritage and the 50th anniversary of the Alcatraz Uprising.

This year’s One City One Book program is a joint partnership with the San Francisco Arts Commission, Oakland Public Library, City College of San Francisco and June Jordan School of Equity. 

Featured Event
Tommy Orange in Conversation – Oct. 16, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

For more information, see sfpl.org/onecityonebook.

About the Author
Tommy Orange is a recent graduate from the MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts. He is a 2014 MacDowell Fellow, and a 2016 Writing by Writers Fellow. He is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. He was born and raised in Oakland, California, and currently lives in Angels Camp, California. (Photo credit: Elena Seibert)

Editorial Reviews + Awards

  • PEN/Hemingway Award winner, 2019
  • The Center for Fiction First Novel Prize winner, 2019
  • National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize winner, 2018
  • Pulitzer Prize (Fiction) finalist, 2019
  • Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction finalist, 2019
  • Art Seidenbaum Award finalist, 2019
  • Aspen Words Literary Prize finalist, 2019
  • Best Book of the Year, New York Times, Washington Post, NPR, Time, O, San Francisco Chronicle, Boston Globe

“Powerful. . . . There There has so much jangling energy and brings so much news from a distinct corner of American life that it’s a revelation.”

The New York Times

“An exquisite mix of unflinching anger and sadness and humor.”

The San Francisco Chronicle

“A rush of intensity and fervor… Bursting with talent and big ideas… Funny and profane and conscious of the violence that runs like a scar through American culture.”
The Seattle Times

“Masterful. White-hot. A devastating debut novel.”
The Washington Post

“A gripping deep dive into urban indigenous community in California: an astonishing literary debut!”
—Margaret Atwood, via Twitter


There There drops on us like a thunderclap; the big, booming, explosive sound of 21st century literature finally announcing itself. Essential.”
—Marlon James, author of A Brief History of Seven Killings

“With a literary authority rare in a debut novel, it places Native American voices front and center before readers’ eyes.” —NPR/Fresh Air

“A symphonic debut…Engrossing… There There introduces an exciting voice.”
Booklist (starred review) “Commanding…The propulsion of both the overall narrative and its players are breathtaking as Orange unpacks how decisions of the past mold the present,resulting in a haunting and gripping story.”
Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Visceral… A chronicle of domestic violence, alcoholism, addiction, and pain,the book reveals the perseverance and spirit of the characters… Unflinching candor… Highly recommended.”
Library Journal (starred review)

“Kaleidoscopic… In this vivid and moving book, Orange articulates the challenges and complexities not only of Native Americans, but also of America itself.”
Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

About One City One Book


One City One Book: San Francisco Reads is an annual citywide literary event that encourages members of the San Francisco community to read the same book at the same time and then discuss it in book groups and at events throughout the City. By building bridges between communities and generations through the reading and most importantly the discussion of – one book, we hope to help to make reading a lifelong pursuit and to build a more literate society. Sponsors for One City One Book include the San Francisco Public Library and Friends of the San Francisco Public Library. The program is also supported by many bookstore partners, program partners and media sponsors.

Harvey Milk: Messenger of Hope

July 22, 2019
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
CONTACT: Charles Schuler
Director of Communications
San Francisco International Airport
650.821.5031
Charles.Schuler@flysfo.com
SF-19-30

Harvey Milk: Messenger of Hope

New Exhibition Celebrates the Life and Legacy of Harvey Milk in SFO’s New Harvey Milk Terminal 1

SAN FRANCISCO – July 22, 2019 – Harvey Milk (1930–1978) made history in 1977 when he became the first openly gay individual elected to public office in the state of California. He would serve just eleven months on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors before his assassination on November 27, 1978. Today, Harvey Milk’s legacy is felt in the gains for LGBTQ rights made during the four decades since his tragic death, including the 2015 United States Supreme Court ruling recognizing same-sex marriage as a legal right. Milk’s nascent vision of increasing worldwide representation in local, statewide, and national political offices peaked with the Rainbow Wave in November of 2018, when a record number of openly gay, lesbian, and transgender candidates were elected to public office. As Milk once declared, “If you help elect more gay people, that gives a green light to all who feel disenfranchised, a green light to move forward…because if a gay person makes it, the doors are open to everyone.” He also recognized that the fight for equality and human rights continues as long as one person is denied their full measure of freedom, that “there is hope that the system can work for all minorities if we fight. We’ve given them hope.”

This exhibition celebrates the life and legacy of the visionary human rights leader, groundbreaking political luminary, and key figure of the LGBTQ rights movement through approximately 100 historic images, campaign material, and press documents.

About the Exhibition

In November of 2018, SFO Museum organized a public call for material pertaining to the life and legacy of Supervisor Harvey Milk. This exhibition features those submissions as well as items from archival collections at the San Francisco Public Library (SFPL) and the GLBT Historical Society. Much of the material is held in the Harvey Milk Archives–Scott Smith Collection, generously donated by Elva Smith to the James C. Hormel LGBTQIA Center (SFPL) in 1996 and to the GLBT Historical Society in 2002. Harvey Milk: Messenger of Hope will remain on view until summer of 2021. A permanent exhibition will be installed pre-security in Harvey Milk Terminal 1 in 2020. Special thank you to photographer Daniel Nicoletta; Susan Goldstein, City Archivist at the San Francisco History Center (SFPL); Dee Dee Kramer, Program Manager at the James C. Hormel LGBTQIA Center (SFPL); Christina Moretta, Photo Curator at the San Francisco History Center (SFPL); Tim Wilson, Librarian and Processing Archivist at the James C. Hormel LGBTQIA Center (SFPL); and Ramon Silvestre, Exhibitions and Collections Chief Registrar at the GLBT Historical Society Archives and Research Center, for their generous assistance with this exhibition.

Visit https://www.sfomuseum.org/exhibitions/harvey-milk-messenger-hope for more information.

Harvey Milk: Messenger of Hope is located post-security in Harvey Milk Terminal 1, San Francisco International Airport. This exhibition is accessible to ticketed passengers from July 23, 2019, to summer of 2021.

@SFOMuseum 
#HarveyMilkExhibition