The Power of Creating Resilience – Art by Transitional Age Youth of San Francisco

For Immediate Release: 

July 2, 2019
Media Contact: Jaime Wong
(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

The Power of Creating Resilience
Art by Transitional Age Youth of San Francisco

SAN FRANCISCO, CAShining a light on the extraordinary talent of young artists, Creating Resilience, an exhibit from the Art Program at Larkin Street Youth Services, looks through the lens of transitional age youth (TAY) and is hosted by the San Francisco Public Library’s TAY(k) Care Program. Organized by Larkin Street – the largest provider of housing, healthcare, employment and education services to young people experiencing homelessness in San Francisco – this exhibit features photographs, sewing and fashion design, music videos, spoken word, poetry, dance, theater and other performance modalities.

The works demonstrate the dedication, leadership and self-determined artistry of some of Larkin Street’s most advanced participating artists, who participate in the program as a means for self-expression and toward career-track employment. These young people are future leaders of these fields, and their bravery and honesty through trying times of transition are a daily inspiration.

The TAY(k) Care program at SFPL is a program created through a Friends of the SF Public Library Innovation Grant which seeks to answer the question: How can the urban library better serve transitional age youth who are experiencing homelessness, are at risk of experiencing homelessness or are marginalized in some other way? As part of the program, librarians are working to create community with local TAY and TAY service providers like Larkin Street.

This exhibit will be on view on the 3rd Floor of the San Francisco Public Library between July 13 and September 19, 2019.

Exhibit: Creating ResilienceJuly 13 –Sept. 19, Main Library, 3rd Floor

Exhibit Celebration

The TAY(k) Care Program of the San Francisco Public Library presents art by transitional age youth (TAY) of San Francisco, featuring participants from the art program at Larkin Street Youth Services.

Creating Resilience — Thursday, Aug. 8, 5 p.m. Main Library, Hormel LGBTQIA Center, 3rd Floor

About San Francisco Public Library 

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

About the Art Program at Larkin Street Youth Services
The Art Program at Larkin Street Youth Services offers daily drop-in art classes and mentoring as well as longer-term career-track coursework. Staff and community artists host individual and group classes, workshops and mentor young artists in visual arts (illustration, painting, animation, media and graphic arts), performing arts, community engaged art practice, music (guitar, piano, percussion, vocal arts), music production (recording and editing), and sewing and design. Career tracks include: Performance, Music Production, Design and more through Larkin Street’s annual Performing Arts Night; an Arts, Media and Entertainment Learning Center, and the Skywatchers youth ensemble. For more information on the Art Program, contact Krista DeNio (415) 673-0911, ext. 272 and Rye Purvis (415) 673-0911, ext. 277.

About Larkin Street Youth Services

Larkin Street Youth Services is a non-profit empowering young people ages 12-24 to move beyond homelessness. Founded in 1984, Larkin Street has served over 75,000 young adults in San Francisco by providing a continuum of healthcare, housing, employment, and education services. Three out of four youth who complete the full range of Larkin Street programs successfully exit homelessness permanently. As San Francisco’s largest service-provider for young people experiencing homelessness, the agency is supported by private donors including foundations, corporations, and individuals, as well as government funding. Larkin Street is also part of the movement to end youth homelessness on a national scale through policy partnerships with national organizations and fellow nonprofits. www.larkinstreetyouth.org