All posts by Public Affairs

Eleventh Annual Tricycle Music Fest Kicks Off October 6 – Live Kindie Music at San Francisco Public Library

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA CONTACT:
Jaime Wong

(415) 557-4295; Jaime.wong@sfpl.org

Eleventh Annual Tricycle Music Fest Kicks Off October 6

Live Kindie Music at San Francisco Public Library

San Francisco Public Library is rolling on out eleven years of Rock! Play! Learn! with its hit music celebration for children, Tricycle Music Fest. The Library welcomes all families to sing and dance along with us at live performances every weekend in October throughout the City.

Opening the festival is Brooklyn-based band The Pop Ups, sharing their unique rock and roll sound this weekend on Sunday, October 6. Jazzy Ash and the Leaping Lizards bring NOLA to the City by the Bay with music influenced by jazz and the joy of Mardi Gras with two performances in October at the North Beach and Ortega Branches. Bay Area favorites the Alphabet Rockers will drop beats inspiring social justice and youth empowerment at the Excelsior and Richmond Branch Libraries. Lastly, wrapping up the month of October, the Library welcomes Grammy and Emmy-winning group The Lucky Band, playing catchy hits from their newly-nominated Latin Grammy album, Buenos Diaz. The Lucky Band closes our series with a special before-open-hours concert at the Main Library bright and early on Sunday, October 27. 

Additionally, Tricycle Music Fest features one very special prize: a tricycle raffle. One lucky concert goer rides off on a new shiny red tricycle at the end of each show.

Tricycle Music Fest is presented jointly by the San Francisco Public Library and San Mateo County Library. San Francisco performances are funded by Friends of the San Francisco Public Library, bringing music, libraries and families together. Release the foot brake on the stroller and boogie on down to the Library to catch a concert with us!

Please see the full schedule of events at sfpl.org/tricycle and smcl.org/tricycle.

Tricycle Music Fest Performances

The Pop Ups – Sunday, October 6, 3 p.m., Main Library, 100 Larkin St., Koret Auditorium

Jazzy Ash and the Leaping Lizards – Saturday, October 12, 11 a.m., North Beach Branch

Jazzy Ash and the Leaping Lizards – Saturday, October 12, 3 p.m., Ortega Branch

Alphabet RockersSunday, October 20, 12 p.m., Excelsior Branch

Alphabet Rockers– Sunday, October 20, 3 p.m., Richmond Branch

Lucky Diaz and the Family Jam Band – Saturday, October 26, 11 a.m., Bernal Heights Branch

Lucky Diaz and the Family Jam Band – Sunday, October 27, 11 a.m., Main Library, 100 Larkin St., Atrium

Who Owns the Earth? New exhibit examines 1800’s masterpiece on societal inequality

For Immediate Release
Media Contacts:

Mary Rose Kaczorowski, Curator
510-459-9448

Jaime Wong, San Francisco Public Library
(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

Who Owns the Earth?

New exhibit examines 1800’s masterpiece on societal inequality

San Francisco,CA – In partnership with the California Chapter of Common Ground USA, the Henry George School of New York City, the Henry George School of San Francisco, the Robert Schalkenbach Foundation and Shaping San Francisco, the San Francisco Public Library announces the launch of an exhibition and programming for “Who Owns the Earth?: Henry George’s Progress and Poverty 140 Years Later.”

Mary Rose Kaczorowski, President of the California Chapter of Common Ground USA states, “The paradox that Henry George saw is still with us. Who has the right to exploit the earth and who profits? Why is there so much poverty amid so much wealth?” This exhibit highlights the life and work of Henry George, the social theorist and economist, who observed this paradox 140 years ago while living and working in San Francisco. His book Progress and Poverty (1879) stirred his generation to question social inequities during the Gilded Age as the pockets of land barons and railroad monopolists fattened off the natural wealth in land. George’s keen analyses offered a simple solution—reinvest the economic value of land back into the society that created it.

While living in his rented house at the foot of San Francisco Bay, George wrote Progress and Poverty. At first self-published in 1879 with the help of friends and fellow typesetters in San Francisco, his book was hailed for its logic and genius at solving societal inequality. Millions of copies sold worldwide in multiple languages.

In addition, George, a contemporary of Mark Twain, was one of the founders of the San Francisco Public Library and the Bohemian Club. He worked as a writer and editor for the Daily Times and was later the editor of the San Francisco Daily Evening Post.

The exhibition will be on view in the San Francisco History Center,located on the 6th Floor of the San Francisco Public Library between October 12and December 28, 2019.

Exhibit: Who Owns the Earth? Henry George’s Progress and Poverty 140 Years LaterOct. 12 – Dec. 28, 2019, Main Library, 6th floor

Related Events:

Meet Henry George

Historian and actor David Giesen takes on the role of Henry George in a Chautauqua performance set in 1890. Addressing the Friends of the San Francisco Public Library, for whom George had been the founding secretary, George reminisces about his San Francisco days during the 1860s and 1870s. Thursday, Nov. 7, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Progress to Poverty: Land and Rents-Free Public Talk

On the 140th anniversary of Henry George’s Progress and Poverty, his land tax and radical reform of land use are worth a critical re-examination. Geographers Francesca Manning and Richard Walker, along with Ted Gwartney of the California chapter of Common Ground USA, untangle what George proposed, what happened as a result of his ideas, and what the future holds.

Wednesday, Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m., Eric Quezada Center for Culture and Politics, 518 Valencia Street, co-sponsored by Shaping San Francisco

About San Francisco Public Library 

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

Free Financial Planning Day at the Library

For Immediate Release

Media Contact: Jaime Wong
(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

Free Financial Planning Day at the Library

San Francisco, CA – The San Francisco Public Library, in partnership with the Financial Planning Association of San Francisco and the San Francisco Treasurer’s Office, is pleased to announce the 10th annual San Francisco Financial Planning Day on October 26, 2019 from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. At this event, Bay Area residents will be able to meet one-on-one with highly qualified Certified Financial Planner™ professionals to discuss their personal finance questions, concerns and interests.

 The event is a great opportunity for a free, objective,private consultation with an expert on a wide variety of personal finance issues, including budgeting, debt management, retirement planning, investment strategies, income taxes, and insurance, among many others. Workshops will include saving and paying for college, planning with student loans, tax planning, investing basics, marriage and financial planning and more. Local nonprofits will be presenting on understanding credit and how to get started with your budget.

Spanish and Chinese translation will be available for one-on-one consultations.

There are no strings attached. Financial planners volunteer their time and will not pass out business cards, marketing materials or sell products or services. They will be stationed at tables to meet with one individual or a couple at a time. Prior events have served 300-400 Bay Area residents each year.

The event is free and open to the public. Registration is encouraged:

Financial Planning Day at the Library – Saturday, Oct. 26, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Main Library, 100 Larkin St.

Fifth International Filipino-American Book Fest scheduled October 12-13 in SF: Pulitzer Prize Winner Jose Antonio Vargas to Headline Event

For Immediate Release

Philippine Writers and Artists (PAWA)

Contact:  Edwin Lozada, 415-525-7487, agustin9558@gmail.com

Fifth International Filipino-American Book Fest scheduled October 12-13 in SF

Pulitzer Prize Winner Jose Antonio Vargas to Headline Event

The Philippine-American Writers and Artists, in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library, will hold the Fifth International Filipino American Book Festival October 12-13, 2019 at the Main Branch of the SFPL on 100 Larkin Street. In response to the urgent call of the times, marked by increasing anti-immigrant rhetoric, the theme of the book fest is “Isang Mundo (One World): Humanity, Diversity, and Resistance in the Arts.”

This year’s book fest promises an exciting and diverse program. Immigrant rights activist and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas will deliver the keynote address at the October 12 opening plenary session. Vargas,who penned his moving memoir Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen, has been a staunch advocate for the rights of the undocumented in the U.S. and is the founder of Define American, aimed at promoting dialogue about immigration issues, including the Dream Act, which would provide a channel to citizenship for the undocumented.

Vargas will join authors, educators, and activists from the Philippines, New Zealand, Singapore, Canada, and major cities in the U.S. for a weekend of literary events, performances, and activities for book lovers of all ages. The only gathering of its kind and with this level of continuity in the Filipino diaspora, the book fest enables Filipino writers from diverse “homes,” genres, and generations to come together and share their works in fiction, non-fiction, and poetry, as well as their unique writing experiences. 

As the book fest is aimed at a multi generational audience, the two-day event will also include storytelling and readings, puppet show, and craft and coloring activities for children. Graphic and fantasy novels, popular among young adults, will be well represented by artists from both the Philippines and the U.S. And since cuisine is a vital component of Filipino culture, writers and chefs, also from both sides of the Pacific, will share stories and recipes about the best-loved Filipino dishes, which have been getting a lot of attention in the U.S. in the last few years.

Attendees will have a spectrum of non-fiction topics to choose from throughout the weekend, ranging from the immigrant experience to the conflict in Mindanao to race, to queer identity and other LGBTQ issues, to history of resistance by Filipinos and Filipino Americans for democracy, equal rights, and social justice. Resistance has been a common thread in the immigrant experience in the U.S. as well as the history of the Philippines against colonialism and authoritarian rulers.

 For the first time in the book fest’s history, journalists will be speaking at a plenary session about their role in the resistance in the age of lies, alternative facts, and runaway social media. This discussion promises to deal with urgent concerns, such as the impact of social media in the current cultural and political landscapes in the Philippines and the U.S.

 In the last few years, the community has witnessed with much pride the explosion of works by Fil-Am authors, who have been receiving international recognition, impressive reviews, and literary awards.  Writers, such as Gina Apostol, Erin Entrada Kelly, Jia Tolentino, Elaine Castillo, and Randy Ribay, have helped put the community on the literary map by their incredible prose. 

Since 2009, and in collaboration with other community organizations, PAWA has been helping create venues for Filipino American artists through the book fest and literary and other cultural events series, such as book readings, performances, and participation in the Hinabi Textile Project, which seeks to increase awareness and appreciation for the exquisite and rich tradition of Philippine weavings and textiles. PAWA also provides access and opportunity to young artists through mentoring and writing scholarships. Through its untiring efforts, PAWA has helped enriched the literary tradition of the Fil-Am community and the rest of the Filipino diaspora, a significant and crucial legacy for future generations.

The all-volunteer organization depends solely on donations by foundations, corporations, non-profit organizations, and individuals to host the book fest. To learn more about PAWA and support the book fest, visit pawainc.com.

To see a full schedule of the book fest, visit filbookfestival.org.

San Francisco Public Library Is Fabulously Fine Free


For Immediate Release: September 16, 2019
Media Contact:
Jaime Wong

(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT

San Francisco Public Library Is Fabulously Fine Free

Effective today, September 16, 2019, San Francisco Public Library has eliminated overdue fines for all Library patrons. Additionally, the Library is clearing all outstanding overdue fines from all patron records.

The San Francisco Public Library was a pioneer in the fine free library movement. SFPL eliminated fines for children and teens in 1974. In recent years, inspired by other library systems that had eliminated fines for overdue materials for patrons of all ages, the Library partnered with the San Francisco Financial Justice Project of the Treasurer’s Office to study whether SFPL should go fine free. The full report on the findings of this study can be found here.

The study found that the elimination of overdue fines in libraries had several positive outcomes:

  • Increased patron access to materials and services
  • Reduction of the inequitable impact of overdue fines
  • Improved patron relationships with their library
  • Optimization of library staff time and increased staff efficiency

After reviewing the findings from the study developed by Library staff and the team at the Financial Justice Project, the San Francisco Public Library Commission voted to approve a resolution urging the City’s Board of Supervisors to amend the Library’s fines and fees schedule, eliminating all overdue fines.

Additionally, the Library Commission voted to approve a resolution urging the Board of Supervisors to pass an ordinance to forgive all outstanding overdue fines owed to the Library and authorize the San Francisco Public Library to clear all outstanding overdue fines from patron accounts.

The two resolutions went before the Board of Supervisors and the Mayor for adoption through the City’s Fiscal Year 2019-2020 budget process. The City budget was signed by Mayor London Breed in August, paving the way for the Library to take final steps in the process of eliminating fines,clearing outstanding fines from patron records, and restoring accounts that had been suspended because they had reached the maximum limit on overdue fines.

While the Library eliminated overdue fines, library users are still responsible for fees associated with the replacement of lost or damaged books and other materials they check out. Under this new policy, it is important to understand the difference between overdue fines and billed-item fees. Overdue fines are the daily charges applied to items not returned by their specified due date. These are the fines that will no longer be charged to patrons. Billed-item fees, or just fees, represent the charges applied for lost,damaged, or unreturned materials and are still in effect.

San Francisco Public Library is part of a nation-wide movement to reduce access barriers and live up to its commitment to free and equal access to its communities. This map from the Urban Libraries Council shows other fine free libraries.

For more information, visit sfpl.org/finefree.

About San Francisco Public Library

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information,knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

¡VIVA! Celebrating Latino Hispanic Heritage – Concerts, Dance, Crafts, Food & Films at the San Francisco Public Library

For Immediate Release: 9/3/19
Media Contacts: Jaime Wong
(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

& Michelle Jeffers
(415) 557-4282; michelle.jeffers@sfpl.org

¡VIVA! Celebrating Latino Hispanic Heritage

Concerts, Dance, Crafts, Food & Films at the San Francisco Public Library

San Francisco,CA – Bienvenidos! In celebration of Latino Hispanic Heritage Month, San Francisco Public Library isproud to announce ¡VIVA!, a citywide celebration of Latino Hispanic cultures with more than 100 music, food, film, dance, crafts and author talks happening mid-September through the end of October.

Adults can step into Cuban and Brazilian dance; enjoy classical Latin music; engage in a discussion with Queer and Trans Latinx writers, activists and leaders; attend a Latinx literary variety show; explore San Francisco History Center’s Carnaval archive; hear live oral histories from the women entrepreneurs of La Cocina’s cookbook and so much more! 

The Library is thrilled to partner with the Mexican Museum: bringing Tecuan masks from their permanent collections, they will educate and lead a unique craft program to construct 2D/3D masks. Local children’s book authors Aida Salazar (The Moon Within) and Mitali Perkins (Between Us and Abuela) showcase their latest titles at read alouds. Feel the beat of music with the Latin Jazz Youth Ensemble. Finally, head to the Main Children’s Center for a presentation from Taller Bombalele on Bomba, a tradition of songs, rhythm and dance steeped in a Taino-African alliance in resistance to colonization and slavery in Puerto Rico.

All library locations throughout the city will be full of papel picado (paper streamers), flores de papel (paper flowers) and ofrendas (altars), ready to host events and classes celebrating Latino Hispanic heritage, cultures and traditions. This year’s ¡VIVA! events embrace all ages and all people. 

Visit sfpl.org/VIVA for more details and to view the ¡VIVA! Program Guide. ¡VIVA! is funded in part by Friends of the San Francisco Public Library. All programs at the Library are free.

¡VIVA! Programs
For a complete list of activities and events, view the program guide.

Special Performances and Highlights

Misión Flamenca Dance Troupe
– Sept. 14, 3 p.m., Main Library, Atrium 

The Moon Within with Children’s Author Aida Salazar – Sept.14, 1 p.m., West Portal Branch

Still Here San Francisco: Queer and Trans Latinx Writers in This CitySept. 14, 2:30 p.m., Mission Branch

Mission Grafica: Off the Wall – Sept. 20, 6:30 p.m., Mission Cultural Center, 2868 Mission St.

Between Us and Abuela with Children’s Author Mitali Perkins – Oct. 12, 2 p.m., Bernal Heights Branch

Queer Latinx History of the Mission’s 16th Street Corridor – Sept. 25, 6 p.m., Eureka Valley Branch 

Hands on History: Carnaval in the Archives – Oct. 1, 6:30 p.m., Main Library, San Francisco History Center, 6th Floor

Literary Events

Book Launch: Maestrapeace: San Francisco’s Monumental Feminist Mural Sept. 14, 1 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Solito, Solita: Crossing Borders with Youth Refugees from Central America – Oct. 8, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium 

Carolina de Robertis – Cantoras – Oct. 9, 6 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Room 

Arts & Crafts Programs

Mask Making with The Mexican MuseumSept. 19, 4 p.m., Marina Branch; Oct. 5, 2 p.m.,Visitacion Valley Branch; Oct. 24, 3:30 p.m., Mission Branch; Oct. 30, 4 p.m. Noe Valley Branch

Zapotec Rugs CraftSept. 20, 4 p.m., Merced Branch

Milagros and Rain Sticks with the Museum of Craft and DesignOct. 12, 2 p.m., Visitacion Valley Branch

Día de los Muertos Skeleton CraftOct. 30, 3:30 p.m., Chinatown Branch

Food Programs

Guacamole Party – Sept. 22, 3 pm., Portola Branch

We Are La Cocina: Recipes in Pursuit of the American Dream – Oct. 15, 6 p.m, Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Room 

Music & Dance Performances

¿Donde Esta Mi Gente? Latinx Literary Variety Show (¡Viva! edition!) – Sept. 18, 6 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Room

Taller Bombalele – Sept. 28, 2 p.m., Main Library, Children’s General Floor Area

Latin Jazz Youth Ensemble of San Francisco – Oct. 26, 3 p.m., Western Addition Branch

Día de Los Muertos Altar Workshops + Programs


Día de los Muertos Altar Workshop

Oct. 27, 2 p.m., Park Branch

Oct. 30, 6 p.m., Excelsior

Oct. 31, 3 p.m., Sunset Branch

Día de los Muertos Altar Workshop – Teens only

Fri. Nov. 1, 4 p.m., Main Library, The Mix

Sat. Nov. 2, 4 p.m., Main Library, The Mix

Día de los Muertos Community Altar

Oct. 25 – Nov. 4, Visitacion Valley Branch

Oct. 26 – Nov. 2, Bernal Heights Branch

Films

La GuajiraOct. 1, 6:30 p.m., Noe Valley Branch

Dolores: Rebel. Activist. Feminist. Mother.– Oct. 5, 3 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium

Una Noche Sin Luna/A Moonless NightOct. 13, 2 p.m., Anza Branch

Peek Into Rock‘n’Roll Past with Backstage Pass

For Immediate Release: 8/28/19
Media Contact: Jaime Wong
(415) 557-4295; Jaime.Wong@sfpl.org

Peek Into Rock‘n’Roll Past with Backstage Pass
New Library Exhibit Features Landmark Rolling Stone Covers, Contact Sheets

SAN FRANCISCO, CAImmortalized by writers, filmmakers and artists, the cover of Rolling Stone magazine is iconic. The exhibition Backstage Pass: Baron Wolman and the Early Years of Rolling Stone explores how the lens of one artist’s camera captured and helped define one of the most important eras in rock’n’roll history. The exhibition will be at the Main Library, Jewett Gallery, August 31 – October 20, 2019.

Through the exhibition’s 35 framed photographs, contact sheets and original Rolling Stone magazine covers, Backstage Pass presents an intimate view of a crucial period of cultural transformation in American history. Visitors go “backstage” to see how photographic coverage of events, such as Woodstock and the Day on the Green, have contributed to our collective cultural memory. Experience through the exhibit how featured artists Jimi Hendrix, Mick Jagger, Janis Joplin, Tina Turner and Frank Zappa came to represent generational ideals through music, words and visual imagery.

Backstage Pass is curated by Ben Ahlvers, gallery director at the Lawrence Arts Center in Lawrence, Kansas. The exhibition is toured by ExhibitsUSA, a national program of Mid-America Arts Alliance (M-AAA).

This exhibit will be on view in the Jewett Gallery on the Lower Level of the San Francisco Public Library between August 31 and October 20, 2019.

Exhibit: Backstage Pass Aug. 31 – Oct. 20, Main Library, Jewett Gallery, Lower Level

Related Programs

Ben Fong TorresHistorian Ben Fong Torres was editor and writer for Rolling Stone almost 50 years ago. Join us as he discusses the San Francisco music scene – and Rolling Stone Magazine.  He’s got stories! Sept. 8, 1p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium


San Francisco Rock Photography in the Psychedelic Era – Rock music author and historian Richie Unterberger presents on San Francisco rock music photography in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Showcasing classic rock photos taken by several notable photographers of the era. Sept. 11, 6 p.m., Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Community Room

About San Francisco Public Library 

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches, the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

Former Japanese American Incarcerees Talk About Their Lives Behind Barbed Wire at Special Program Featuring Screening of Documentary, Moving Walls

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 22, 2019

Press contact: Sharon Yamato, (310) 922-6525

Former Japanese American Incarcerees Talk About Their Lives Behind Barbed Wire at Special Program Featuring Screening of Documentary, Moving Walls

Former WWII Japanese American detainees Hiroshi Kashiwagi and Yae Wada, both in their 90s will join filmmaker Sharon Yamato and photojournalist Stan Honda in a special presentation at San Francisco Public Library’s Koret Auditorium that focuses on the WWII camp experience, Saturday, Sept. 7, at 2 pm. Civil rights activist and attorney Don Tamaki will serve as moderator.

Kashiwagi is an award-winning poet, actor, memoirist, and playwright who was a librarian at San Francisco Public Library for 25 years. He was incarcerated as a teenager at the Tule Lake Segregation Center, a camp designated for those who refused to answer affirmatively to the so-called “loyalty questionnaire” that was instituted by the U.S. government. Branded disloyal, he spent years fighting for his citizenship back after renouncing it during the war. Also serving on the panel is Yae (Katanayagi) Wada, a 99-year-old retiree currently residing in Berkeley, who recently spoke for the first time publicly about suffering a miscarriage during the war while temporarily housed in a horse stall at the Tanforan Assembly Center in San Bruno.

The program will begin with a screening of Yamato’s film, Moving Walls, a documentary short that focuses on what happened at one of the Japanese American incarceration sites after the war when hundreds of barracks were sold for a dollar apiece to veterans-turned-homesteaders. Both film and an accompanying book chronicle the history of these barracks as they went from the Heart Mountain concentration camp to the Wyoming homestead. Because the buildings at this camp were distributed widely after the war, they can be seen today throughout the Park County area surrounding the camp. One of the buildings that survived is now permanently exhibited at the Japanese American National Museum and represents the largest and most important visual artifact from the confinement period. Yamato recorded the histories of those who lived in the barracks during the war and followed the aftermath of the hastily constructed buildings built to imprison more than 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry.

Award-winning New York photographer Stan Honda is renowned for his coverage of September 11, and two of his photos are featured in the 9/11 Memorial and Museum in New York City. Currently known for his night sky photography, he remains committed to furthering the incarceration story partially based on his own family’s experience of being held at a camp in Poston, Arizona. His photos are featured in the film’s accompanying book, Moving Walls: The Barracks of America’s Concentration Camps, and are currently on display at the Military Intelligence Service Historic Learning Center at the Presidio in an exhibition sponsored by SF’s National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS) through Sept.30.

Both Yamato and Honda will also be conducting a gallery talk at the MIS Learning Center at 640 North Mason Street at the Presidio on the morning preceding the program, Sept.7, at 11 a.m.

This project was funded by the Department of Interior, National Park Service (NPS) through the Japanese American Confinement Sites (JACS) grant program for the year 2014-2015, it was published under the fiscal sponsorship of Visual Communications, Inc. Additional funds for the screening and panel discussion were provided by the California State Library’s California Civil Liberties Public Education Program.

For more information on this program, contact Sharon Yamato at sharony360@gmail.com.

Moving Walls – September 7, 2 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St.

City Librarian Appoints Maureen Singleton as San Francisco Public Library Chief Operating Officer

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Monday, August 19, 2019

Contact: SFPL Public Affairs (415) 557-4277

*** PRESS RELEASE ***

CITY LIBRARIAN APPOINTS MAUREEN SINGLETON AS

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

Singleton has served as Acting COO since March 2018

Photo credit: Sonia Rivas of FotosRivas

San Francisco, CA – San Francisco City Librarian Michael Lambert today appointed Maureen Singleton to serve as San Francisco Public Library’s Chief Operating Officer (COO). Singleton, formerly the Library’s Chief Financial Officer, has served as Acting COO since March 2018.

During her tenure, San Francisco Public Library has witnessed an unprecedented period of success and sustained excellence, from the completion of the Branch Library Improvement Program (BLIP), achieving National Library of the Year honors in 2018 and most recently with the Library achieving the highest overall grade (A-) ever bestowed upon any department of city government in San Francisco. Singleton also provided the financial case to the Board of Supervisors to enable the Library to eliminate overdue fines.

“I am thrilled to be promoting Maureen Singleton to serve as the Library’s first ever Chief Operating Officer,” said Lambert. “Maureen is mission driven, a careful steward of the community’s resources and passionate about the myriad opportunities to positively impact the lives of city residents through library services.”

Singleton is a 17-year veteran of the City and County of San Francisco, getting her first experience with city government career as a budget analyst for the Board of Supervisors’ Budget Analysts Office. She also worked for the city’s Department of Public Health, the Public Library and the Public Works Department. She was appointed Chief Financial Officer at San Francisco Public Library in 2011.

“I am honored and excited to serve as the Library’s Chief Operating Officer and to be able to work alongside staff who are dedicated to making a difference. I firmly believe that libraries are centers of our communities, providing access to information, creating opportunities, and serving as a rising tide to lift up our society,” said Singleton.

A native San Franciscan, Singleton began her career in public service as a case worker in Senator Dianne Feinstein’s office. She holds a Master of Public Administration from the University of Washington, Evans School of Public Policy and Governance and a Bachelor of Science in Economics from the California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. She lives with her husband and daughter in the East Bay.

About San Francisco Public Library

San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community. The library system is made up of 27 neighborhood branches,the San Francisco Main Library at Civic Center and four bookmobiles.

The 2019 Effie Lee Morris Lecture Series Celebrates Women Writers

For Immediate Release: 8/19/19
Media Contact: Lyn Davidson, Main Library, Fisher Children’s Center
(415) 557-4552; Carole.Davidson@sfpl.org

The 2019 Effie Lee Morris Lecture Series Celebrates Women Writers

Acclaimed authors to share powerful stories in September and October

SAN FRANCISCO, CA Join the San Francisco Public Library Main Children’s Center this fall as we present the 23rd and 24th Effie Lee Morris Lectures. The lectures will celebrate the voices of two gifted female authors, Renée Watson on Thursday, September 5, and F. Isabel Campoy on Wednesday, October 2.

Renée Watson is the Coretta Scott King Award-winning author of the young adult novel Piecing Me Together (Bloomsbury, 2017). The novel, a powerful story about an ambitious teenager carving out her place in the world, was named a John Newbery Honor Book in 2018. Watson’s newest work, a middle grade novel titled Some Places More Than Others, will be published on September 3 by Bloomsbury Children’s Books. Watson will deliver the 23rd Effie Lee Morris Lecture on September 5.

F. Isabel Campoy is the author of numerous children’s books in the areas of poetry, theatre, biographies and art, and the recipient of the International Latino Children’s Book Award. Her picture book Maybe Something Beautiful (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016) was inspired by the Urban Art Trail project in San Diego. Campoy will deliver the 24th Effie Lee Morris Lecture on October 2.

The Effie Lee Morris Lectures honor the work of the late Effie Lee Morris by celebrating the work of writers and illustrators for children whose work exemplifies the causes she championed: inclusivity, diversity and the rights of all children to read, learn and create. Ms. Morris was the first coordinator of children’s services at the San Francisco Public Library, the first African American president of the Public Library Association and a founder of the local chapter of the Women’s National Book Association (WNBA). Historically an annual event, 2019 marks the first year that the Library will host two Effie Lee Morris Lectures.

Sponsored by the Main Library’s Fisher Children’s Center, Friends of the San Francisco Public Library and the San Francisco chapter of the Women’s National Book Association, the author talks are free and open to all ages. A book signing will follow each lecture. Registration is suggested as space is limited.

23rd Annual Effie Lee Morris Lecture with Renée Watson, “The Miracle of Joy: How Stories Heal” – September 5, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St.

Registration link: https://sfpl-effie-lee-morris23.eventbrite.com

24th Annual Effie Lee Morris Lecture with Isabel Campoy, “Mi Voz Latina for a Choir of Diversity In Children’s Literature”  – October 2, 6 p.m., Main Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Larkin St.

Registration link: https://sfpl-effie-lee-morris24.eventbrite.com